Nylon tent vs Canvas tent

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Sandinista
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Re: Nylon tent vs Canvas tent

Postby Sandinista » Mon Apr 24, 2017 10:50 am

You don't need a tent. Just buy some good weapons, ammo, and then look around and take the tent you want (wait for someone else to carry it to wherever you're going and get it all set up for you). When it wears our just "liberate" another one from someone who can't stop you! :)

Just kidding, let's not get everyone jumping all over me!

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Re: Nylon tent vs Canvas tent

Postby BackBlast » Thu May 18, 2017 1:29 am

iWriteStuff wrote:
Wed Sep 10, 2014 10:40 am
Long term usage. I've got an eight person two room nylon tent, but I've been told that ain't gonna cut it for long term (6 months to year) usage. I also have tarps aplenty, and find it much more economical (ie: cheaper) but if that's not going to be as good, well, maybe I'll just have to sacrifice a bit longer until I can find something better.
UV eats most tent material pretty rapidly if used "long term". This goes for both nylon and canvas. Canvas will hold up better, but the delta could be measured in months and not years. Actual date ranges will depend on altitude, but I'm guessing you get about 1 month to 3 months out of a nylon tent before the UV eats it to the point of material failure through use or wind. Canvas might go as long as 5-7 months before similar failure.

You can hit much much longer numbers if you keep your tent out of the sun.

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Re: Nylon tent vs Canvas tent

Postby brianj » Thu May 18, 2017 9:45 pm

I don't recall seeing this thread before, so let me throw my two cents in.

How are you planning to get to where you set up the tent, and do you plan to set up shop there long term or do you plan to be mobile? If you are driving to your destination and parking right by the tent site, canvas will probably be the choice you want. It's durable, canvas tents are usually significantly larger than nylon tents, and you can put a stove inside. But they are heavy and bulky so if you need to carry it somewhere, especially if you need to do so on a regular basis, you will want something more compact and less heavy. If I wanted the option to be mobile but planned on long term use, I would buy a four season nylon tent.

Something else I would do, at least in the beginning if I were planning to stay put for more than a couple of nights, is to pull out a 12 x 12 foot tarp and some paracord so I can hang the tarp above the tent to help protect it from the elements. In the longer term I would probably use available resources to built a better shelter.

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Re: Nylon tent vs Canvas tent

Postby Sasquatch » Sat May 20, 2017 8:00 pm

Silver wrote:
Mon Apr 24, 2017 10:25 am
That's a great first post. I see you have a tent stove in there. From the picture, it doesn't look cold enough to require a stove, but I'm no expert on camping in the mountains. What brand stove do you use? How much does it weigh? How do you carry it to the camp site?
Nights in the mountains can be chilly even during the warmer months.

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Re: Nylon tent vs Canvas tent

Postby brlenox » Tue May 23, 2017 8:02 pm

iWriteStuff wrote:
Wed Sep 10, 2014 8:21 am
Some fellow preppers at church and I were discussing the merits of nylon tents vs canvas tents. I was told nylon tents are crap and the only tent worth owning is a canvas tent. This is sad news to me, since all I have is a nylon tent and canvas tents are kinda on the spendy side.

Anyone else here have any opinions on the subject? Better yet, what can be done with a nylon tent to make it more durable and heat efficient? I would like to consider modifying it or reinforcing it prior to just chucking it altogether and starting over with a canvas tent. I've also made some improvised tent heaters that are both energy efficient and cost efficient, so that should help.

Please tell me I don't need to go shell out $300 for a canvas tent. I'm doing all I can just to fill the tent with warm things.

The big issue with tents is UV protection as that it what provides for a longer life. Nylon tents are what is called a single season tent and they deteriorate rapidly in the elements. What you are looking for is called a 4 season tent. As well, there is only one organization that makes a tent, lives in the tent, and then makes modifications to improve their tent and that is the military. I know a few prepper experts that advocate a military tent over any other for sustained living in one place. They are heavy (my large GP tent is around 800 lbs) and so not suitable for moving around alot.

The military heating source is a multi-fuel type stove which will adapt to gas, propane, wood, coal, white gas and probably a few other things. I have two, a medium GP tent (16X32) and the a fore mentioned Large GP (18X52) . Both have an additional inside liner to ad an insulation dimension as well as a floor section with windows for cross venting. After reading Elder Hollands talk I find I am less concerned about leaving to the mountains but could easily see my material used for a meeting house or otherwise. If I do dwell in it with my family, I have two large cabin style nylon tents which can provide rooms for married couples and provide some privacy and they will be protected from the elements by being inside the large GP tents. Nighttime heating of the smaller space will be much easier.

As well they are made from a vinyl based canvas that will not tear, nor burn readily and it is free from the chemicals formerly used for fireproofing. Still one should always have a tent repair kit handy for emergencies.

Now the price was 700.00 for the large gp still in the crate never opened, while the Medium GP was around 1100.00 dollars. The medium I bought at a local army surplus reseller and the large I bought off of the government auctions website. Six of us went in together and we bid on several tent auctions and scored a great deal. Of course you need to pick them up yourself or have a shipper pick it up for you. That added another 400.00 per tent for us.

Frankly I would never own a cloth canvas tent if I planned on sustained dwelling of over a year. Of course I suspect that I will might never use my tents and that they will be used for other purposes but I have them either way.

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Re: Nylon tent vs Canvas tent

Postby BackBlast » Wed May 24, 2017 12:12 pm

brlenox wrote:
Tue May 23, 2017 8:02 pm
The big issue with tents is UV protection as that it what provides for a longer life. Nylon tents are what is called a single season tent and they deteriorate rapidly in the elements. What you are looking for is called a 4 season tent. As well, there is only one organization that makes a tent, lives in the tent, and then makes modifications to improve their tent and that is the military. I know a few prepper experts that advocate a military tent over any other for sustained living in one place. They are heavy (my large GP tent is around 800 lbs) and so not suitable for moving around alot.
I generally agree with this. If you want a tent that will endure with a track record, you want mil surplus. Even the mil surplus tents are going to have a limited lifespan, if left fully in the elements you may get a full year out of them at altitude. More at sea level.

The next step up from this is to go to a semi-portable structure that only vaguely resembles a tent and may take quite some time to setup. I don't have a link handy, but when I researched them you could get a building designed to last 15 years at altitude for about $2.5k, ~250 sqft that was in the weight class of 500-1200 lbs.

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Re: Nylon tent vs Canvas tent

Postby Juliet » Thu May 25, 2017 10:27 am

I have a 10 by 14 foot canvas kodiak tent, that is pretty light at 84 lbs, comparatively. It has aluminum poles and it can handle the wind! It is like a spring bar tent. It cost us $500 on sale (it is more than that now) on amazon. I am pretty much in love with it. One time camping in our old Nylon tent, we had to put rocks in it so it wouldn't blow away. Now, when wind hits our tent, it blows with it and is just fine. The design has 3 main poles holding up the whole tent, so it is flexible in the wind. It is also easy to put together. I recommend this tent for anybody and anything. However, it does get really hot inside in the summer. The stitching is well done compared to other tents where zippers come apart and such. I am just sayin, it is the best tent out there.

https://www.amazon.com/Kodiak-Canvas-Fl ... odiak+tent

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Re: Nylon tent vs Canvas tent

Postby brianj » Fri May 26, 2017 9:14 pm

brlenox wrote:
Tue May 23, 2017 8:02 pm
The big issue with tents is UV protection as that it what provides for a longer life. Nylon tents are what is called a single season tent and they deteriorate rapidly in the elements. What you are looking for is called a 4 season tent. As well, there is only one organization that makes a tent, lives in the tent, and then makes modifications to improve their tent and that is the military. I know a few prepper experts that advocate a military tent over any other for sustained living in one place. They are heavy (my large GP tent is around 800 lbs) and so not suitable for moving around alot.
Not accurate. There are four season tents made of nylon. Here are reviews of 20 four season tents, all made of nylon and all less than 10 pounds:
http://www.outdoorgearlab.com/topics/ca ... eason-tent

Furthermore, one lesson I quickly learned in the Corps is that nylon tents aren't indestructible and won't last forever. Yes, if you don't mind staying in one location or loading an 800 pound tent onto a couple of backpacks you will have something a lot more durable than a four season nylon tent, but it will still be damaged by UV light.

Were money not an object, I would have both a durable canvas tent and a top of the line four season backpacking tent. Since money is an object I will use the tents I have acquired. Either way, if at all possible, I will suspend a tarp over the tent to shield it from direct sunlight.

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Re: Nylon tent vs Canvas tent

Postby brlenox » Fri May 26, 2017 11:38 pm

brianj wrote:
Fri May 26, 2017 9:14 pm
brlenox wrote:
Tue May 23, 2017 8:02 pm
The big issue with tents is UV protection as that it what provides for a longer life. Nylon tents are what is called a single season tent and they deteriorate rapidly in the elements. What you are looking for is called a 4 season tent. As well, there is only one organization that makes a tent, lives in the tent, and then makes modifications to improve their tent and that is the military. I know a few prepper experts that advocate a military tent over any other for sustained living in one place. They are heavy (my large GP tent is around 800 lbs) and so not suitable for moving around alot.
Not accurate. There are four season tents made of nylon. Here are reviews of 20 four season tents, all made of nylon and all less than 10 pounds:
http://www.outdoorgearlab.com/topics/ca ... eason-tent

Furthermore, one lesson I quickly learned in the Corps is that nylon tents aren't indestructible and won't last forever. Yes, if you don't mind staying in one location or loading an 800 pound tent onto a couple of backpacks you will have something a lot more durable than a four season nylon tent, but it will still be damaged by UV light.

Were money not an object, I would have both a durable canvas tent and a top of the line four season backpacking tent. Since money is an object I will use the tents I have acquired. Either way, if at all possible, I will suspend a tarp over the tent to shield it from direct sunlight.

I don't think we are talking about the same thing at all and I'm not sure you read the stats on the tents at the link you provided. Perhaps these tents are all that the reviews claim, however, anyone willing to spend that kind of coin on a single person tent is not a person prepping for longevity in a tent stay. Certainly not for a family. Secondly, I think you have mistaken their criteria for what they are defining as a four season tent. Theirs is simply from the professional mountain climbers perspective of encountering any and all types of weather during a limited time use scenario. So it is four season from the perspective that the tents are durable and solid and can take whatever you toss at it. However, I could not find where any of them claimed UV protection, as that is not their focus. However, for anyone who plans for an extended stay that must be a part of their consideration. Those tents at the link you provided are not anticipated for anyone that is going to try to live in a tiny tent barely large enough to hold an extra water bottle for any great length of time.

In the sense of four season from the prepper mentality , we are defining a tent made of material that is prepared to sustain all types of weather conditions and to do so over the period of an extended stay. Any tent without a liner is compromised for the coldest nights below zero or colder. UV protection is vital for long term. Once again, I'll stand behind the observation that only one institution provides a tent, lives in that tent for extended multi year periods and modifies based on actual experience and that is the military. Nonetheless, there are reasons to consider other types if for nothing else, most of the military tents are heavy (part of being durable for extended periods) and not convenient for moving around. As well, I suspect that a multi-year requirement is only absolute worst case scenario and that the exceptional capacity of a military tent is most likely over kill.

However, plan for the worst is kind of the prepper mentality.

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Re: Nylon tent vs Canvas tent

Postby Spaced_Out » Sat May 27, 2017 12:48 am

Just get a decent bow saw with a few spare blades and a chopper, heavy 1/4 inch thick machete or an axe and a few durable tarps and you are good to go.
Very easy to build a durable shelter with wood or dig one into the ground.
Canvas is better but a pain to transport. You can also get a block of bees wax to treat the canvas to make it more durable and waterproof.

Just did a google search for US prices you can get a bow saw in the US for under $12 and a few spare blades for additional $10 and a decent solid axe like the Estwing E45A 26" Steel Camper's Axe Single Bit for under $50, another $20 -$30 for tarps and you are done.

Less than $100 and your bugout accommodation is sorted, and you have very good wood working implements. You can also source all the items secondhand and with $30 get what you need.

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Re: Nylon tent vs Canvas tent

Postby brianj » Sat May 27, 2017 9:24 pm

brlenox wrote:
Fri May 26, 2017 11:38 pm
brianj wrote:
Fri May 26, 2017 9:14 pm
brlenox wrote:
Tue May 23, 2017 8:02 pm
The big issue with tents is UV protection as that it what provides for a longer life. Nylon tents are what is called a single season tent and they deteriorate rapidly in the elements. What you are looking for is called a 4 season tent. As well, there is only one organization that makes a tent, lives in the tent, and then makes modifications to improve their tent and that is the military. I know a few prepper experts that advocate a military tent over any other for sustained living in one place. They are heavy (my large GP tent is around 800 lbs) and so not suitable for moving around alot.
Not accurate. There are four season tents made of nylon. Here are reviews of 20 four season tents, all made of nylon and all less than 10 pounds:
http://www.outdoorgearlab.com/topics/ca ... eason-tent

Furthermore, one lesson I quickly learned in the Corps is that nylon tents aren't indestructible and won't last forever. Yes, if you don't mind staying in one location or loading an 800 pound tent onto a couple of backpacks you will have something a lot more durable than a four season nylon tent, but it will still be damaged by UV light.

Were money not an object, I would have both a durable canvas tent and a top of the line four season backpacking tent. Since money is an object I will use the tents I have acquired. Either way, if at all possible, I will suspend a tarp over the tent to shield it from direct sunlight.

I don't think we are talking about the same thing at all and I'm not sure you read the stats on the tents at the link you provided. Perhaps these tents are all that the reviews claim, however, anyone willing to spend that kind of coin on a single person tent is not a person prepping for longevity in a tent stay. Certainly not for a family. Secondly, I think you have mistaken their criteria for what they are defining as a four season tent. Theirs is simply from the professional mountain climbers perspective of encountering any and all types of weather during a limited time use scenario. So it is four season from the perspective that the tents are durable and solid and can take whatever you toss at it. However, I could not find where any of them claimed UV protection, as that is not their focus. However, for anyone who plans for an extended stay that must be a part of their consideration. Those tents at the link you provided are not anticipated for anyone that is going to try to live in a tiny tent barely large enough to hold an extra water bottle for any great length of time.

In the sense of four season from the prepper mentality , we are defining a tent made of material that is prepared to sustain all types of weather conditions and to do so over the period of an extended stay. Any tent without a liner is compromised for the coldest nights below zero or colder. UV protection is vital for long term. Once again, I'll stand behind the observation that only one institution provides a tent, lives in that tent for extended multi year periods and modifies based on actual experience and that is the military. Nonetheless, there are reasons to consider other types if for nothing else, most of the military tents are heavy (part of being durable for extended periods) and not convenient for moving around. As well, I suspect that a multi-year requirement is only absolute worst case scenario and that the exceptional capacity of a military tent is most likely over kill.

However, plan for the worst is kind of the prepper mentality.
Got it. I see where the confusion came from. But, unless you are preparing for a Julie Rowe idea of going to camps organized by the church where large numbers of people are living in tents mostly provided by the church, why would you live in a tent for more than a few days? Is there any environment in which an inventive and resourceful person can't assemble a shelter superior to a canvas tent?

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Re: Nylon tent vs Canvas tent

Postby brlenox » Sat May 27, 2017 9:51 pm

brianj wrote:
Sat May 27, 2017 9:24 pm
brlenox wrote:
Fri May 26, 2017 11:38 pm
brianj wrote:
Fri May 26, 2017 9:14 pm
brlenox wrote:
Tue May 23, 2017 8:02 pm
The big issue with tents is UV protection as that it what provides for a longer life. Nylon tents are what is called a single season tent and they deteriorate rapidly in the elements. What you are looking for is called a 4 season tent. As well, there is only one organization that makes a tent, lives in the tent, and then makes modifications to improve their tent and that is the military. I know a few prepper experts that advocate a military tent over any other for sustained living in one place. They are heavy (my large GP tent is around 800 lbs) and so not suitable for moving around alot.
Not accurate. There are four season tents made of nylon. Here are reviews of 20 four season tents, all made of nylon and all less than 10 pounds:
http://www.outdoorgearlab.com/topics/ca ... eason-tent

Furthermore, one lesson I quickly learned in the Corps is that nylon tents aren't indestructible and won't last forever. Yes, if you don't mind staying in one location or loading an 800 pound tent onto a couple of backpacks you will have something a lot more durable than a four season nylon tent, but it will still be damaged by UV light.

Were money not an object, I would have both a durable canvas tent and a top of the line four season backpacking tent. Since money is an object I will use the tents I have acquired. Either way, if at all possible, I will suspend a tarp over the tent to shield it from direct sunlight.

I don't think we are talking about the same thing at all and I'm not sure you read the stats on the tents at the link you provided. Perhaps these tents are all that the reviews claim, however, anyone willing to spend that kind of coin on a single person tent is not a person prepping for longevity in a tent stay. Certainly not for a family. Secondly, I think you have mistaken their criteria for what they are defining as a four season tent. Theirs is simply from the professional mountain climbers perspective of encountering any and all types of weather during a limited time use scenario. So it is four season from the perspective that the tents are durable and solid and can take whatever you toss at it. However, I could not find where any of them claimed UV protection, as that is not their focus. However, for anyone who plans for an extended stay that must be a part of their consideration. Those tents at the link you provided are not anticipated for anyone that is going to try to live in a tiny tent barely large enough to hold an extra water bottle for any great length of time.

In the sense of four season from the prepper mentality , we are defining a tent made of material that is prepared to sustain all types of weather conditions and to do so over the period of an extended stay. Any tent without a liner is compromised for the coldest nights below zero or colder. UV protection is vital for long term. Once again, I'll stand behind the observation that only one institution provides a tent, lives in that tent for extended multi year periods and modifies based on actual experience and that is the military. Nonetheless, there are reasons to consider other types if for nothing else, most of the military tents are heavy (part of being durable for extended periods) and not convenient for moving around. As well, I suspect that a multi-year requirement is only absolute worst case scenario and that the exceptional capacity of a military tent is most likely over kill.

However, plan for the worst is kind of the prepper mentality.
Got it. I see where the confusion came from. But, unless you are preparing for a Julie Rowe idea of going to camps organized by the church where large numbers of people are living in tents mostly provided by the church, why would you live in a tent for more than a few days? Is there any environment in which an inventive and resourceful person can't assemble a shelter superior to a canvas tent?
Pretty much, I have always figured that the tents were not for me. Not sure who or what but for now they take up a massive chunk of my garage.

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Re: Nylon tent vs Canvas tent

Postby BackBlast » Mon May 29, 2017 6:30 am

brianj wrote:
Sat May 27, 2017 9:24 pm
Got it. I see where the confusion came from. But, unless you are preparing for a Julie Rowe idea of going to camps organized by the church where large numbers of people are living in tents mostly provided by the church, why would you live in a tent for more than a few days? Is there any environment in which an inventive and resourceful person can't assemble a shelter superior to a canvas tent?
I have always enjoyed this channel.

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Re: Nylon tent vs Canvas tent

Postby BackBlast » Wed Jun 21, 2017 7:16 am

These are the semi-portable shelters you can expect 10-15 years out of.

https://www.farmtek.com/farm/supplies/p ... 00R4N.html

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Re: Nylon tent vs Canvas tent

Postby JohnnyL » Wed Jun 21, 2017 10:00 am

brianj wrote:
Sat May 27, 2017 9:24 pm
brlenox wrote:
Fri May 26, 2017 11:38 pm
brianj wrote:
Fri May 26, 2017 9:14 pm
brlenox wrote:
Tue May 23, 2017 8:02 pm
The big issue with tents is UV protection as that it what provides for a longer life. Nylon tents are what is called a single season tent and they deteriorate rapidly in the elements. What you are looking for is called a 4 season tent. As well, there is only one organization that makes a tent, lives in the tent, and then makes modifications to improve their tent and that is the military. I know a few prepper experts that advocate a military tent over any other for sustained living in one place. They are heavy (my large GP tent is around 800 lbs) and so not suitable for moving around alot.
Not accurate. There are four season tents made of nylon. Here are reviews of 20 four season tents, all made of nylon and all less than 10 pounds:
http://www.outdoorgearlab.com/topics/ca ... eason-tent

Furthermore, one lesson I quickly learned in the Corps is that nylon tents aren't indestructible and won't last forever. Yes, if you don't mind staying in one location or loading an 800 pound tent onto a couple of backpacks you will have something a lot more durable than a four season nylon tent, but it will still be damaged by UV light.

Were money not an object, I would have both a durable canvas tent and a top of the line four season backpacking tent. Since money is an object I will use the tents I have acquired. Either way, if at all possible, I will suspend a tarp over the tent to shield it from direct sunlight.

I don't think we are talking about the same thing at all and I'm not sure you read the stats on the tents at the link you provided. Perhaps these tents are all that the reviews claim, however, anyone willing to spend that kind of coin on a single person tent is not a person prepping for longevity in a tent stay. Certainly not for a family. Secondly, I think you have mistaken their criteria for what they are defining as a four season tent. Theirs is simply from the professional mountain climbers perspective of encountering any and all types of weather during a limited time use scenario. So it is four season from the perspective that the tents are durable and solid and can take whatever you toss at it. However, I could not find where any of them claimed UV protection, as that is not their focus. However, for anyone who plans for an extended stay that must be a part of their consideration. Those tents at the link you provided are not anticipated for anyone that is going to try to live in a tiny tent barely large enough to hold an extra water bottle for any great length of time.

In the sense of four season from the prepper mentality , we are defining a tent made of material that is prepared to sustain all types of weather conditions and to do so over the period of an extended stay. Any tent without a liner is compromised for the coldest nights below zero or colder. UV protection is vital for long term. Once again, I'll stand behind the observation that only one institution provides a tent, lives in that tent for extended multi year periods and modifies based on actual experience and that is the military. Nonetheless, there are reasons to consider other types if for nothing else, most of the military tents are heavy (part of being durable for extended periods) and not convenient for moving around. As well, I suspect that a multi-year requirement is only absolute worst case scenario and that the exceptional capacity of a military tent is most likely over kill.

However, plan for the worst is kind of the prepper mentality.
Got it. I see where the confusion came from. But, unless you are preparing for a Julie Rowe idea of going to camps organized by the church where large numbers of people are living in tents mostly provided by the church, why would you live in a tent for more than a few days? Is there any environment in which an inventive and resourceful person can't assemble a shelter superior to a canvas tent?
It is a possibility if you are on someone else's land, public land, a controlled environment, or temporary. Earthquake, fire, etc. could put one in that situation. But still, those situations don't seem like they'd pass more than a few months at most (and likely not surpass one month).

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Re: Nylon tent vs Canvas tent

Postby JohnnyL » Wed Jun 21, 2017 10:03 am

BackBlast wrote:
Wed Jun 21, 2017 7:16 am
These are the semi-portable shelters you can expect 10-15 years out of.

https://www.farmtek.com/farm/supplies/p ... 00R4N.html
Decent for sure, a little expensive. I've seen some that are accordion-folded, so it's easier to pick up and move.

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Re: Nylon tent vs Canvas tent

Postby gardener4life » Wed Jul 19, 2017 1:03 pm

I was thinking that canvas rips so easily...and also the canvas tents have tent poles that will break with barely even bumping them wrong. So this is an issue....

Here are the problems I see that i'd like to discuss too...and I'm interested in feedback.

1) if you ever needed a tent then your food storage situation won't work because if you do the math on how much food storage 1 person actually uses in 1 year you are screwed. What I'm saying is that if you NEED the tent you would be away from home. But if you are away from home how would you lug around 500 pounds of food....and 500 pounds would only be a 1 year supply for maybe 2 people not 10 and many people have kids...the problem of moving your supplies conflicts with the preparation in some ways because if you had to leave home to use your tent, then chances are you won't be able to buy gas. Any thoughts on this?

2) Also the problem of tent heaters doesn't work because you can't carry and hold a year supply of propane or natural gas around. Just lugging the food around is bad enough. I'm not saying you shouldn't. I'm just saying there's more than 1 problem to solve. And most people are thinking OK, I'll overcome the canvas of the tent with a tent heater without thinking that the tent heater would run out of fuel within probably 1 week.

3) The expensiveness of canvas tents really does bother me. Is there like a do it yourself kit and sewing pattern for these somewhere? It seems like buying one is just a ticket to ripoff-ville. And I have also noticed how many emergency preparedness stores are out there right now trying to get rich quick with high prices...that's kind of a priestcraft in a way.

4) Here's an idea out there that I want to do a feel over with you guys; there's this tribe of natives up in Siberia that herd reindeer. I forgot their name but they do this idea of 1 big huge outer tent made of hides, and then put a smaller tent inside it. The idea is you stay, sleep, survive, etc, inside the smaller tent keeping both outer tent and inner tent flaps shut, sealed, etc. Then it creates a warm pocket in the smaller tent from the buffer zone created by the two different atmospheres being cut off from the outside of the tent. I would wager that this idea will work with adaptations on modern tents though I don't have the funds right now to test it. I would like to test this concept soon and I think it could work provided that the inner tent is some time of dome tent structure that has a simple set up that won't conflict with the outer tent concept. (Also this is the same way igloos work.)

5) Nobody is talking about the fact that your food storage is probably going to have to be in one of the tents. That seems to be a problem because food storage is vulnerable to rain or snow or moisture hitting it. All your food preparation could go up in flames if your dry goods food storage get wet. And vinyl tents practically leak the moisture through. (on the food storage threads I also didn't see people talking about how to keep bugs, and rodents out of your food storage, which WILL happen too.) If you actually had to need to use your tent you also probably won't be able to control what time of year your 'emergency' hits; fall, summer, spring, and hopefully not winter...

6) I'm surprised nobody has brought up on any of the forums how tennis shoes would be worthless and degrade quickly in these environments compared to a durable boot, etc.

7) I'm curious if the price of getting leather hides is actually going to be cheaper than the canvas and more efficient if someone had a pattern and sewing kit to make their own tent or tipi.

JohnnyL
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Re: Nylon tent vs Canvas tent

Postby JohnnyL » Wed Jul 19, 2017 7:19 pm

Food storage in mylar bags, plastic buckets, etc. wouldn't be much of a problem.
Lots of tents won't be used in the wild, but nearer. Imagine there's an earthquake. Set up a tent in the park, in a neighbor's yard, etc.

The idea of a tent inside a tent would definitely be warmer.

I actually like tennis shoes more sometimes when we're out in the wild... They're much lighter than boots. But not as good for the wild.

Baysimove
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Re: Nylon tent vs Canvas tent

Postby Baysimove » Thu Jul 27, 2017 5:31 pm

Well it can be more safe from the heat if you have canvass but it is more useful. So, consider it as an investment.


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