Heat is Online

Discuss political news items / current events.
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dlbww
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Re: Heat is Online

Postby dlbww » Wed Apr 27, 2016 9:42 am

.
Last edited by dlbww on Sun Nov 13, 2016 7:29 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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msfreeh
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Re: Heat is Online

Postby msfreeh » Wed Apr 27, 2016 9:55 am

you got that right about politicians

https://robertscribbler.com/2016/04/26/ ... he-arctic/" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;

Republican Climate Change Denial is Blinding Our Ability to Observe the Arctic
Denial.

It’s all-too-often what happens to the powerful when they are confronted with the consequences of their own bad actions. It can best be said that denial is blindness — the willful inability to open one’s eyes to the tough reality of the world. In literature, we can see denial in the tragic sin of hubris and in the metaphor of Oedipus the King gouging his own eyes out as a result of his failure to come to terms with the warnings of prophecy.

In the psychological sense, denial involves the inability to cope with reality such that a person will act in an irrational fashion to the point of generating fantasies that the object of said denial does not exist. Behaviorally, this results in an increasing degradation of a person’s ability to confront or cope with the object of denial — to the point of ardent, irrational, and possibly destructive outbursts when faced with it.

Arctic sea ice loss.

Ever since 1979 an array of satellite sensors has allowed our scientists to directly observe the sea ice in the Arctic. Since that time, and as a human-forced warming of the world ramped up, the area which that ice covers has dramatically shrunken. So much so that by this year, 2016, there’s a risk that not only will a new all-time record low be reached, but that by the end of this summer almost all the ice in the Arctic Ocean will be melted out entirely. A risk that a new climate change related event will start to take shape in the Arctic. The blue ocean events.



(Arctic sea ice area as measured by observational satellites and most recently by F17. The bottom line of the graph measures days of the year. The left side of the graph measures sea ice area. The corresponding intersections determine sea ice area on any given day of a year in the record. The up and downward swoop of eac

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Re: Heat is Online

Postby msfreeh » Wed Apr 27, 2016 5:38 pm

https://robertscribbler.com/2016/04/27/ ... the-globe/" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;


Climate Change Drives Half a Billion People to Suffer Hunger, Water Shortages as Droughts and Heatwaves Wreck Crops Across the Globe
At least 12 Indian states are believed to be facing famine and experts have warned that the water crisis could worsen if urgent action is not taken. — Greenpeace statement taken yesterday by The International Business Times.

******

A human-forced warming of the globe is a trigger for increasingly severe droughts, water shortages, food shortages, and heatwaves intense enough to cause mass casualties. As global temperatures during 2015 and 2016 have risen to more than 1 degree Celsius above preindustrial readings, we’ve seen more and more reports coming in of these kinds of climate-change driven disruptions.

A new study out this week from the European Commission has found that 240 million people across the world are now suffering from food stress. With Greenpeace now warning that 330 million people in India alone are faced with water shortages and threat of famine, and with millions more coming under both food and water stress in Vietnam as a record Southeast Asian heatwave ramps up to never-before-seen extreme temperatures — it appears now that more than half a billion people around the world are dealing with a climate change driven food and water crisis.

It’s a growing global crisis that has now come to affect more than 45 nations. One that has put at least 80 million of those now suffering from hunger at a food stress level just one step below famine. One whose primary trigger appears to be widespread and expanding drought and extreme weather due to global temperatures hitting new all-time record highs.



(Despite what is probably the best global system ever devised to prevent and reduce hunger, the European Commission now finds that 240 million people are at risk of food stress. A number that is likely incomplete as a newly emerging heatwave in Southeast Asia is drying up food and water supplies for millions. Image source: The European Commission.)

It’s a situation that international agencies appear to be scrambling to keep track of. For with each passing week there appears to be new information about another country falling under food and water stress or of one already affected seeing conditions among strained populaces worsen.

Hunger Expanding Across The Globe

In the Equatorial and near-Equatorial regions of the world, nations are particularly vulnerable to the stress of rising temperatures. There, soil moisture is already tenuous in many regions. As temperatures rise, rates of evaporation increase and marginal areas can rapidly fall into drought. In addition, many regions reliant on glacier and snow melt to provide water during summer are seeing mountain snows vanish and high elevation glaciers dwindle away as consistently above freezing temperatures invade further and further into the higher elevations.

Across Africa, Southern and Eastern Asia, The Middle East, and Central America this story has been writ large as new climate change driven heat and dryness appears to have hit a tipping point this year. Severe heatwaves, droughts, and dwindling rivers are setting off intense hunger crises in North Korea, Bangladesh, Afghanistan, Yemen, Sudan, Ethiopia, Egypt, Central Africa, and Nigeria — countries that now each host more than 10 million people under acute food stress. These are grim figures. But the numbers, in many cases, fail to tell the whole story of how dire the situation has actually become.

In North Korea, for example, officials there are warning of another Arduous March — a period of famine during the late 1990s and coinciding with droughts and rising global temperatures that killed more than 3.5 million in that country. Aid to North Korea during the 2000s alleviated some of the endemic hunger. But by the then record warm year of 2010 the droughts had re-emerged, and reports of hunger, stunted growth among children, and famine had again cropped up. In 2015, amidst global temperatures that had risen still higher, North Korea experienced its worst drought in at least 100 years. By as early as March, drought and heat had once-more settled in over a broad swath of Asia. And late last month, the state-run news agency Rodong Sinmun issued the following statement alluding to a rising risk of famine conditions in the country:

We may have to go on an arduous march, during which we will have to chew the roots of plants once again.



(A hothouse created by ongoing fossil fuel burning and related carbon emissions has set off droughts and heatwaves around the world leaving riverbeds and farmlands baked and bleached. Image source: India Water Portal.)

More than a score of other nations now see between 1-10 million people in their countries facing hunger. Places like Cambodia, Madagascar, Iraq, Pakistan, Venezuela, Libya, Hait

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dlbww
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Re: Heat is Online

Postby dlbww » Wed Apr 27, 2016 11:58 pm

Someone should tell those in the Netherlands about global warming: https://www.armstrongeconomics.com/arms ... taneously/" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;

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Re: Heat is Online

Postby dlbww » Tue May 10, 2016 4:40 pm

And while we're taxing CO2 emissions lets start taxing water because, well, it's not free, it doesn't just fall from the sky ...
https://www.armstrongeconomics.com/worl ... tax-water/" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;

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Re: Heat is Online

Postby msfreeh » Tue May 10, 2016 10:28 pm

https://robertscribbler.com/2016/05/10/ ... es-ignite/" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;


Massive Wildfires Erupt in Northeast China as Lake Baikal Blazes Ignite
As human fossil fuel emissions force the world to warm, moisture and precipitation levels are changing. Wet areas become wetter.  Dry areas become drier. Spring and Summer temperatures increase. And earlier spring snow-melt causes soils to remain drier for longer periods, increasing incidents of drought while lengthening the wildfire season. These hot, dry conditions also increase the likelihood that, once wildfires are started by lightning strikes or human error, they will become more intense, larger and long-burning (paraphrase of this Union of Concerned Scientists Report).

******

An extreme heatwave and drought in East Asia is now sparking extraordinarily large wildfires in mostly unsettled regions of Northeast China near the Russian border. The massive fires are plainly visible in the LANCE-MODIS satellite shot and include at least four contiguous

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Re: Heat is Online

Postby msfreeh » Thu May 12, 2016 8:29 am

See Earth’s Temperature Spiral Toward 2°C

Published: May 9th, 2016




http://www.climatecentral.org/news/see- ... d-2c-20332" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;

By Andrea Thompson

The steady rise of Earth’s temperature as greenhouse gases accumulate in the atmosphere and trap more and more heat is sending the planet spiraling closer to the point where warming’s catastrophic consequences may be all but assured.

That metaphoric spiral has become a literal one in a new graphic drawn up by Ed Hawkins, a climate scientist at the University of Reading in the United Kingdom. The animated graphic features a rainbow-colored record of global temperatures spinning outward from the late 19th century to the present as the Earth heats up.

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Re: Heat is Online

Postby msfreeh » Sat May 14, 2016 7:22 pm

https://robertscribbler.com/2016/05/13/ ... re-likely/" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;




Polar Heatwave Digs in as Arctic Sea Ice Crashes — Blue Ocean Event Looking More and More Likely
We’ve never seen May heat like what’s being predicted in the Arctic over the next seven days. A shot of warm airs blowing northward over Siberia that are expected to generate a warm front that takes in nearly the entire Arctic Ocean. A weather pattern that, if it emerges, will completely compromise the central region of polar cold that has traditionally driven Northern Hemisphere weather patterns.

*****

This week, a huge pulse of warm air rose up over Northwest Canada and Alaska. Invading the Beaufort, it drove a broad warm front which forced near or above freezing temperatures over between 1/4 to 1/3 of the Arctic Ocean zone. Regions from the East Siberian Sea, through the Chukchi, into the Beaufort, and including a chunk of the polar zone above the 80th parallel all experienced these anomalously warm readings. By Friday, air temperature anomalies in the entire Arctic zone above 66 North were about 3 C above average and in a large section of the hot zone centered on the Beaufort temperatures ranged between 10-15 C above average. For the Arctic, it appeared that June had arrived a month early.

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Re: Heat is Online

Postby msfreeh » Mon May 16, 2016 7:17 am

http://www.theguardian.com/environment/ ... re-records" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;

April breaks global temperature record, marking seven months of new highs
Latest monthly figures add to string of recent temperature records and all but assure 2016 will be hottest year on record


Global land and sea temperature was 1.11C warmer in April 2016 than the average temperature for April during the period 1951-1980.

Sunday 15 May 2016 20.28 EDT Last modified on Sunday 15 May 2016 22.08 EDT

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Re: Heat is Online

Postby msfreeh » Fri May 20, 2016 10:49 am

http://www.theguardian.com/commentisfre ... orm-divest" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;


Let's give up the climate change charade: Exxon won't change its stripes
Bill McKibben





also see

India




Indians demand government action after temperatures hit 51C
Hospitals struggle to cope as patient numbers soar and cold water in short supply after hottest day

http://www.theguardian.com/world/2016/m ... es-hit-51c" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;


Youths cool off in Kolkata. Temperatures are expected to stay high in June. Photograph: Piyal Adhikary/EPA
Vidhi Doshi in Mumbai and Jon Boone in Islamabad
Friday 20 May 2016 09.37 EDT Last modified on Friday 20 May 2016 10.45
also see

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Re: Heat is Online

Postby msfreeh » Wed May 25, 2016 1:47 pm

https://robertscribbler.com/2016/05/20/ ... peratures/" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;


Wet Bulb Near 35 C — Heatwave Mass Casualties Strike India Amidst Never-Before-Seen High Temperatures
Never-before-seen high temperatures and high humidity are resulting in thousands of heat injuries and hundreds of heat deaths across India. In some places, wet bulb readings appear to be approaching 35 C — a level of latent heat never endured by humans before fossil fuel burning forced global temperatures to rapidly warm. A reading widely-recognized as the limit of human physical endurance and one whose more frequent excession would commit the human race to enduring an increasing number of episodes of killing heat. A boundary that scientists like Dr. James Hansen warned would be exceeded if a human-forced warming of the world was not halted.

*****

And it is in this newly dangerous climate context that temperatures near 125 degrees Fahrenheit settled in over India’s border region with Pakistan yesterday. A blistering wave of crippling heat hitting never-before-seen readings over that highly-populated nation. In Phalodi, India, the mercury rocketed to 123.8 degrees Fahrenheit (51 degrees Celsius). This reading exceeded India’s previous all-time record high for any location which stood at 123.1 degrees Fahrenheit (50.6 degrees Celsius) set on May 25, 1886. Across the border in Pakistan, temperatures crossed “critical” thresholds this week, hitting 124.7 degrees Fahrenheit (51.5 degrees Celsius) Thursday in the city of Jacobabad as officials in that state issued health warnings to the public.

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Re: Heat is Online

Postby msfreeh » Sat May 28, 2016 2:04 pm

https://robertscribbler.com/2016/05/27/ ... r-meeting/" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;



Multi-Day ‘Siege of Storms’ Follows Exxon Shareholder Meeting
A multi-day siege of severe thunderstorms morphed into a major flash flood event in parts of Texas, Kansas, and other states late Thursday into Friday, and more severe weather is expected into Friday night. — Weather Underground.

*****

It was a stifling hot and humid day that set the scene for the Exxon shareholder meeting this week. There, in Dallas, Texas on Wednesday, oil company CEO Rex Tillerson found himself besieged by environmentalists enraged over his company’s decades-long campaign to misinform the public on climate change and by shareholders concerned about the company’s future prospects. But what the climate change denying oil company CEO, and even NOAA weather forecasters, didn’t know was that an extreme rainfall event worsened by the very smoke and fumes emitted by Exxon was starting to gather over Southeast Texas — not far from where the shareholder proceedings were taking place.



(Protesters urge stockholders to dump Exxon in a push for accountability over Exxon’s deceptive language and media campaigns related to emissions-based climate change. Image source: Exxon Facing Heat Over Climate Change.)

At the meeting, Rex Tillerson, set to retire in 2017, spewed out his usual pro-fossil-fuel rhetoric — defending the myth that oil represents the inevitable mainstay of global energy and concocting various straw-man arguments imagining oil protesters filling up cars with gasoline or flying jet airplanes to join in an array of embittered protests surrounding this week’s shareholder meeting. Rallying the board of directors, Tillerson managed to deflect numerous shareholder attempts to positively modify Exxon’s behavior with regards to fossil fuel emissions and responses to climate change. Outside the meeting, protestors called for keeping oil reserves in the ground, urged Exxon to transition to a non-fossil fuel based energy company and acknowledge and prepare for climate change, or urged Exxon investors to dump stock holdings in response to the company’s decades-long-effort to stifle effective climate action.

Outside the meeting, a 13 foot long ice statue spelling out the words — #ExxonKnew — rapidly melted in the sweltering heat of an atmosphere roiled by the powerful climate-altering forces fossil fuel entities like Exxon had already unleashed upon the airs :( of our world.

‘Siege of Storms’ Batters Texas

By Thursday, the day after Exxon’s shareholder meeting, an expansive trough had extended down from Canada and over Texas. Exploiting this hole in an increasingly weakened Jet Stream cool, Arctic airs plunged south. Crossing the Great Plains into Texas, this unstable atmospheric mass came directly into confrontation with a super-heated, moist flow rising off the Gulf of Mexico and Pacific Ocean.



(Very heavy storms firing off over Southeastern Texas have dumped record amounts of rainfall over portions of the state and set off a flash flood emergency. Image source: NOAA.)

Both the big Jet Stream dip and the extreme moisture content in the airs over Texas were not normal. Both were new features enabled by a human-forced (Exxon-forced) warming of the world. For with global temperatures early this year spiking to 1.4 C above 1880s values, the planetary atmosphere is now enabled to contain about a ten percent higher moisture load than during the late 19th Century. It’s a weird new atmosphere that is now capable of producing storms with previously unimaginable heights of 70,000 feet over temperate Latitudes. And as the current

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Re: Heat is Online

Postby msfreeh » Tue May 31, 2016 6:58 am

2 stories



1.

https://www.wunderground.com/blog/weath ... -in-42-day" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;

Half of Thailand's Weather Sites Break All-time Heat Records in 42 Days
By: Christopher C. Burt , 9:09 PM GMT on May 30, 2016


Half of Thailand's Weather Sites Break All-time Heat records in 42 Days

All-time national heat records have been set this past April and May in India, Thailand, Laos, Cambodia, and the Republic of Maldives. The unprecedented heat has killed hundreds in India and dozens in Thailand so far. But nothing in the record books can compare to what has recently occurred in Thailand: a large country with over 120 meteorological sites that has seen half of its official weather stations break their all-time heat records. Here are the details.

We knew the ‘super’ El Nino this past year would have a big affect on the world’s climate. It did not produce the hoped for big rains in California but it did produce the heat and drought in Southeast Asia as forecast. Of all the countries effected the most by this event Thailand has proven to see something exceptional weather-wise: more than half of all the country’s official weather sites reported their all-time heat records during the months of April and May. Thailand’s meteorological service only dates back to 1951 but it is a large country with over 120 official




2.




https://www.wunderground.com/news/patte ... start-june" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;

Pattern Shift Will Bring Potential Record Heat to the West, Cool and Wet Conditions in the East


Linda Lam
Published: May 31, 2016
A shift in the weather pattern is ahead for much of the country as May ends and June begins.

This shift will bring temperature changes for many, as well as an increase of showers and thunderstorms across portions of the South and East.

This change in the weather pattern will begin early this week. An upper-level trough, or southward dip in the jet stream, that has been in place over the West will slowly slide eastward and be replaced by an upper-level ridge of high pressure. 

Late Week Setup
Very warm temperatures are expected to build across the West as the week progresses, just in time for the start of meteorological summer (June 1-August 31). 

Meanwhile, cooler conditions will be found across parts of the East, although

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Re: Heat is Online

Postby msfreeh » Sun Jun 12, 2016 8:36 pm

https://robertscribbler.com/2016/06/10/ ... ely-cause/" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;



India’s Monsoon is Delayed For Third Year in a Row — Climate Change is Likely Cause
“It has been observed that since 2001, places in northern India, especially in Rajasthan, are witnessing a rising temperature trend every year. The main reason is the excessive … emission of carbon dioxide.” — Laxman Singh Rathore, the director general of the India Meteorological Department.

*****

The reduction in India’s monsoon rains is a big deal. It generates systemic drought, creates a prevalence for heatwaves, and locally amplifies the impacts of human-caused climate change. For three years now, the Indian monsoon has been delayed. India is experiencing its worst heatwaves ever recorded and water shortages across the country are growing dire. The monsoonal rains are coming, again late. And people across India — residents as well as weather and climate experts — are beginning to wonder if the endemic drought and heat stress will ever end.

Historically, there was only one climate condition known to bring about a delay in India’s Monsoon — El Nino. And last year, a strong El Nino is thought to have contributed both to the Monsoon’s late arrival and to a very severe drought that is now gripping the state. What the 2015 El Nino cannot also account for is the 2014 delay and weakening of monsoonal rains. And during 2016, as India’s monsoon has again been held back by 1-2 weeks, and El Nino is now but a memory, it’s beginning to become quite clear that there’s something else involved in the weakening of India’s annual rains.

Indian Monsoon Delayed Third Year in a Row



(Onset of the Indian Monsoon has been delayed for three years in a row now. A condition likely caused by a human-forced warming of the world and one that is worsening an extreme drought and heatwave situation across the country. Image source: The India Meteorological Department.)

As of today, the eastern edge of the Southeast Asian monsoon had only advanced to the middle of Myanmar. This late progress is two weeks behind the typical advance of the monsoon in this part of the world at this time of year. Further west, the monsoon has extended somewhat futher — only trailing the typical monsoon’s advance by 5 days along the western coast of India.

With La Nina blooming in the Eastern Pacific, there’s no other climatological excuse for this delay. The El Nino influence is mostly gone. And all that’s left is a global climate context in which temperatures have now risen to around 1.3 C hotter than 1880s averages.

Climate Change is Likely Cause

Scientific studies modeling the impacts of human-forced warming have long found that heating the Earth atmosphere resulted in an eventual delay and weakening of the Indian monsoon. A study published last year in Geoscience Frontiers continued this line of study. Global Circulation Model (GCM) runs found that the Indian monsoon was expected to be delayed by 15 days on average during the 21st Century due to human caused climate change. That the amount of precipitation provided by the monsoon would be reduced by about 7

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Re: Heat is Online

Postby msfreeh » Thu Jun 16, 2016 8:09 am

https://robertscribbler.com/2016/06/15/ ... proves-it/" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;




Al Gore’s Revenge — Internal Combustion Engines Stink and This Ridiculously Powerful Electric Turbine Truck Proves It
As of yesterday, Nikola Motors announced the performance specs and preorders for its new hybrid electric long-haul truck. It’s a ridiculously awesome design — one that boasts across the board superior performance when compared to internal combustion engine based trucks that are currently available. The company producing this amazing feat of electrical hybrid vehicle engineering calls its new vehicle the Nikola One. But we’re going to have some fun at the expense of climate change deniers and electric vehicle detractors both here and call this thing Al Gore’s Revenge.

*****



(Nikola One aka Al Gore’s Revenge. It’s big, it’s red, it’s mean, it’s electric — and it’s about to eat internal combustion engine based trucking market share for lunch. Image source: Nikola Motor Company.)

If there’s ever been a name that climate change deniers tried to turn into a nasty joke, it’s Al Gore. Back in the late 1990s, Al Gore displayed amazing foresight and did the prescient, responsible thing by working to incentivize a transition to electrical vehicles. He rightfully attacked internal combustion engines for the inefficient, wasteful and fossil-fuel dependent beasts that they were. Calling them infernal internals, he was probably the first person of political standing to make the apt link, in reference, between climate change and hell on Earth.

For his good deeds and for his speaking truth to the political and economic powers of the day, Gore was largely demonized in the fossil fuels industry supported republican media. Pretty much anyone who defended Al Gore was attacked. And, for a while, despite a glaringly huge and growing scientific consensus, climate change deniers pretended that the notion of human caused climate change itself was the sole mental invention of this sensitive and thoughtful man.

Now, though, the joke is on the climate change deniers and on the fossil fuel industries, like Peabody Coal, who paid to support their demonization of climate leaders. For now even the fossil fuel haven that was long haul trucking is starting to fall due to the superior physical performance potentials of electric engines.

Al Gore’s Revenge — Electric Engines Aren’t Just Cleaner, They’re Better

Nikola One is an 18 wheel long haul trucking rig. Powered by an electric turbine engine, its 320 kwh battery pack is capable of propelling the vehicle, without the aid of any additional tanked fuel source, more than 190 miles. Tanked fuel then lengthens the legs of the more efficient electrical turbine giving it an ultimate total systems range of 1,200 miles. By comparison, an ICE-powered standard truck typically boasts a range of just 500 miles. As a result, the combined fuel efficiency of this massive rig is between 10 and 15 miles per gallon. This is 2-3 times the fuel efficiency rating of standard long haul trucks and about the fuel efficiency averag

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Re: Heat is Online

Postby msfreeh » Thu Jun 16, 2016 8:54 pm

Two stories


1.

http://www.desmogblog.com/2016/06/16/ex ... y-movement" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;

Exxon Sues MA Attorney General In Retaliatory Attempt To Intimidate ‘Exxon Knew’ Climate Accountability Movement
Acting like a wounded and cornered beast, ExxonMobil has launched what appears to be a blatantly retaliatory and frivolous lawsuit against Massachusetts Attorney General Maura Healey.

Beneath a very thin veil, this legal maneuver by Exxon is seemingly an effort to intimidate any and all who seek to hold the oil giant accountable for its multi-million dollar campaign to attack climate science and sow doubt through decades of deception.

Just to remind everyone – 17 Attorneys General are investigating what Exxon knew about climate science and when, as well as what the company has done to potentially mislead policymakers and the public in order to delay action to address climate change.

Exxon has claimed that there has always been uncertainty within the company about the role of fossil fuels in causing climate change.

Yet, as InsideClimate News and the LA Times and Columbia School of Journalism and the Center for International Environmental Law and other investigations have pointed out, Exxon and others in the oil industry had advanced knowledge of the link between fossil fuel combustion and global warming decades ago.

And DeSmog uncovered an Exxon document that unequivocally stated the company’s knowledge in the late 1970s. Read DeSmog's investigation: “There is no doubt”: Exxon Knew CO2 Pollution Was A Global Threat By


2.


http://www.desmogblog.com/" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;

Conservative Funders of Climate Denial Are Quietly Spending Millions To Generate More Partisan Journalism
Millions of dollars have been pouring into conservative media outlets and student journalism projects from the same groups funding climate science denial, a DeSmog analysis has found.

Analysis of IRS tax filings shows the funding groups, including some linked to the oil billionaire Koch brothers, are trying to combat a perceived left-wing bias in media with cash to ideologically-aligned projects.

Many of the funded journalism projects also produce stories that claim human-caused climate change is either a liberal hoax or that policies to mitigate it, such as promotion of renewable energy, are an unnecessary drag on the economy.

DeSmog found that two linked funds — Donors Trust and Donors Capital Fund — have been a key source of cash for organisations attacking climate science and opposing policies

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Re: Heat is Online

Postby msfreeh » Mon Jun 20, 2016 5:58 pm

http://touch.latimes.com/#section/2426/ ... lated=true" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;


122 degrees: Palm Springs breaks record — and it could get hotter

Coping with the heat wave in Southern California

June 20, 2016, 6:46 p.m.
Every so often someone walks into the Palm Springs Visitors Center raring to burn through hiking trails like they're British adventurer and TV personality Bear Grylls.

For those people, Ceej Juarez, who provides information about hiking trails in the Agua Caliente Indian reservation, has to be a voice of reason.  And that is never as important a job as it was on Monday, when a torrid heat wave sent temperatures to 122 degrees in the resor

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Re: Heat is Online

Postby msfreeh » Sun Jul 03, 2016 8:30 am

robertscribbler
Scribbling for environmental, social and economic justice



https://robertscribbler.com/" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;


A Season of Record Melt — Sea Ice Extent In Uncharted Territory For 94 Days
From March 25th through June 26th, sea ice extent measures, as provided by Japan’s Arctic data system were in record low ranges. In other words, for about a quarter of a year, and according to this monitor, the Arctic Ocean and its surrounding estuaries have witnessed the lowest ice coverage ever measured for any similar period since record keeping began in the 1979.



(An amazingly long period of record low sea ice extents in JAXA’s sea ice monitor.)

This new period of extreme sea ice record lows comes during a time of continuous decadal sea ice losses. Average sea ice coverage for each successive ten year period since the 1980s during the March through June period has fallen by about 400,000 to 500,000 square kilometers. For 2016, the new record lows widened this gap to more than 2 million square

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Re: Heat is Online

Postby msfreeh » Wed Jul 06, 2016 10:42 am

https://robertscribbler.com/2016/07/05/ ... hern-tier/" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;




Fahrenheit 85.9 Near Arctic Ocean Shores — Extreme Heatwave Settles in Over North-Central Siberia, Canada’s Northern Tier
70.8 North, 69.2 East. It’s the Lat, Long coordinate location of a section of the Yamal Peninsula in Siberian Russia. A typically chilly region of frozen but now thawing ground more than 4 degrees of Latitude north of the Arctic Circle. A place that saw the appearance of odd, disturbing (and now controversial) methane blowholes pockmarking

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Re: Heat is Online

Postby msfreeh » Sat Jul 09, 2016 10:22 am

https://climatecrocks.com" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;

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Re: Heat is Online

Postby msfreeh » Sat Jul 09, 2016 5:19 pm

https://robertscribbler.com/2016/07/08/ ... te-change/" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;

Coastal Cities, Critical Infrastructure Unprepared to Face the Rising Tides of Climate Change
Civitas — the latin word for city and the root word for civilization. Civilization, in other words, is a collection of component cities. And, by extension, any major threat to a large number of cities is a threat to civilization itself. Such is the case with human-forced climate change.

*****

It’s a sad fact that many of the hundreds of coastal cities around the world are living on borrowed time. Current greenhouse gas levels — topping out near 408 parts per million CO2 (and 490 parts per million CO2e) this year — will need to fall in order to prevent 1-3 C of additional warming and 25 to 60 feet or more of sea level rise over the coming decades and centuries. And even if we somehow dialed atmospheric CO2 and CO2e levels back to 350 ppm, it’s likely that we’d still see seas eventually rise by 10-20 feet over the long term due to already destabilized glaciers in places like Greenland or West Antarctica.

But with fossil fuel burning continuing at near record levels globally, and with many corporations and political bodies around the world dragging feet on greenhouse gas emissions cuts, the level of heat-trapping carbon held aloft in our airs will continue to rise for some time. These vastly irresponsible actions will further heat the atmosphere and ocean — melting a greater share of the world’s land ice and forcing seas to ultimately rise even more. If CO2e exceeds a range of 550 to 650 parts per million — which could easily happen even under so-called moderate rates of fossil fuel burning before the middle of the 21st Century — then all the land ice on Earth will be placed under melt pressure. And that vast sum of ice melt represents about 220 feet of sea level rise long term so long as the greenhouse gas melt and heat pressure remains.



(Seas have been rising in concert with ocean warming and fossil fuel burning since the start of the 20th Century. At first, during the first half of the 20th Century, rates of rise were less than 1 mm per year. By the 1993 through 2016 period, sea level rise averaged 3.39 mm per year. And since 2011, the rate of rise appears to have steepened into the range of 4 to 6 milimeters per year. Image source: AVISO.)

Even more disturbing is the fact that in the geological past, glacial melt has not tended to process in a gradual, orderly fashi

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Re: Heat is Online

Postby msfreeh » Thu Jul 14, 2016 10:41 am

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Climate Change is Pushing Lake Okeechobee’s Water Levels Higher — And that’s Bad News For Algae Blooms, Flood Risk
More powerful storms. Heavier extreme rainfall events. Storms with higher potential energy. These are the result of a human-forced warming of the Earth’s atmosphere. And South Florida finds itself sandwiched between heavier evaporation flows streaming off the Gulf of Mexico, a more volatilely stormy North Atlantic, and large rivers of moisture streaming in from the Southeast Pacific.



(Atmospheric water vapor levels over South Florida during late June of 2016. South Florida sits between numerous heavily laden atmospheric moisture flows. As human forced warming increases evaporation, these moisture flows expand, resulting in heavier rainfall potentials during storms over South Florida. This climate change dynamic is increasing over-topping flood risks for Lake Okeechobee even as the added heat and rainfall run-off enhances the potential for toxic algae blooms like the one now afflicting South Florida. Image source: Earth Nullschool).

And as these moisture-enhanced storms of climate change dump heavier and heavier rains over South Florida’s Lake Okeechobee, the choice appears to be one between flood risk or toxic algae blooms.

*****

Flood Risk Worsens With Climate Change

Lake Okeechobee sits at the heart of South Florida. Covering 730 square miles, the lake is bounded on the north, east, and west by farms. Run-off from these farms streams into the lake, feeding the growth of algae blooms. As the Earth’s atmosphere and ocean warmed due to human greenhouse gas emissions, rainfall events over South Florida have grown more intense. This trend increases run-off from pesticide, phosphorous, and nitrogen rich soils which then swell the lake with these chemicals and compounds — many of which promote the growth of cyanobacteria (or blue-green algae).

The increasingly heavy rains also force lake levels higher. During Winter of 2016, the wettest January in South Florida’s climate record pushed Lake Okeechobee’s water levels to 16.4 feet above sea level by February. November through May is South Florida’s dry season. So abnormally wet conditions during a typically dry period greatly increased flood risk for communities surrounding the lake as South Florida entered its June through October wet season.

Heavy rains have continued through recent months and, in order to mitigate the heightened flood risk, the US Army Corp of Engineers has been pumping large volumes of the run-off enhanced

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Re: Heat is Online

Postby msfreeh » Mon Jul 18, 2016 8:49 am

News & Blogs
Dr. Jeff Masters' Blog





https://www.wunderground.com/blog/JeffM ... t-energy-i" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;

Eastern Pacific Hurricane Parade Continues; Record Ocean Heat Energy in the Atlantic
By: Jeff Masters and Bob Henson , 3:04 PM GMT on July 18, 2016


The Eastern Pacific's unending parade of tropical cyclones continues. The latest member of the show is Hurricane Estelle, which got its name Friday night. Joining the party Tropical Storm Agatha started on July 2 have been Category 4 Hurricane Blas, Category 2 Hurricane Celia, Category 3 Hurricane Darby, and soon-to-be Category 1 Hurricane Estelle (Estelle was a high-end tropical storm with 70 mph winds at 11 am EDT Monday.) This puts us well ahead of climatology: the Eastern Pacific usually does not see its fifth named storm until July 22, its fourth hurricane until August 12, and its second major hurricane until August 19. An average season has 15 named storms, 8 hurricanes, and 3 major hurricanes.


Figure 1. VIIRS visible satellite image of ex-Hurricane Celia, Hurricane Darby, and Tropical Storm Estelle taken on Sunday afternoon, July 17, 2016. Image credit: NASA.

Frank and Georgette on the way?
In their 8 am EDT Monday Tropical Weather Outlook, NHC identified two more areas of possible tropical cyclone formation in the Eastern Pacific off the Pacific coast of Mexico. They gave 2-day and 5-day odds of development of 0% and 20% to one area, and 0% and 50% to the other. Both the European and GFS models show the potential for these areas of concern to become Tropical Storm Frank and Tropical Storm Georgette by late this week or early next week--though the models are not as gung-ho about developing these systems as they were for Agatha, Blas, Celia, Darby, and Estelle. The two potential new storms are expected to take a track to the west or west-northwest away from or parallel to the coast Mexico. The July record for named storms forming in the Eastern Pacific is seven, set in 1985, according to NHC hurricane scientist Eric Blake. If we get a Tropical Storm Georgette this year, that would tie the July record.

The Atlantic remains quiet--but beware of this year's ocean heat content!
As is usually the case when the Eastern Pacific is active, the Atlantic is quiet. This inverse correlation in activity occurs because the conditions over the Eastern Pacific driving this July's bounteous activity--surface low pressure and rising air--creates a compensating area of sinking air over the tropical Atlantic. This sinking air creates surface high pressure and dry weather--the antithesis of conditions needed for tropical cyclone formation. There are no tropical cyclone threat areas in the Atlantic to discuss today, and none of the reliable models for tropical cyclone formation is predicting development during the coming five days. Don't expect to see much activity in the Atlantic until the Eastern Pacific's burst of activity slows down. When we finally do get the surface low pressure, rising air, low wind shear, plentiful low to mid-level moisture and an African tropical wave needed to spawn an Atlantic hurricane, watch out. Record to near-record levels of heat energy are in the Atlantic in the Caribbean, Gulf of Mexico and waters surr

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Re: Heat is Online

Postby msfreeh » Tue Jul 19, 2016 10:43 pm

https://robertscribbler.com/2016/07/19/ ... on-record/" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;

Global Heat Leaves 20th Century Temps ‘Far Behind’ — June Another Hottest Month on Record
We’ve left the 20th century far behind. This is a big deal. — Deke Arndt, head of NOAA’s National Centers for Environmental Information

*****

One of the top three strongest El Ninos on record is now little more than a memory. According to NOAA, sea surface temperatures (SSTs) in the Central Equatorial Pacific hit a range more typical to La Nina conditions last week. This cool-pool formation follows a June in which ocean surfaces in this zone had fallen into temperatures below the normal range.



(El Nino had faded away by June and turned toward La Nina-level temperatures by late June and early July. Despite this Equatorial Pacific cooling, June of 2016 was still the hottest June on record. Image source: NOAA.)

But despite this natural-variability related cooling of the Equatorial Pacific into below-normal ranges, the globe as a whole continued to warm relative to previous June temperatures. According to NASA, last month was the hottest June in the global climate record.

NASA figures show the month was 0.79 degrees Celsius warmer than the 20th century baseline (1951 to 1980) average, edging out June of 2015 (when El Nino was still ramping up) by just 0.01 degree C to take the dubious

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Re: Heat is Online

Postby msfreeh » Thu Jul 21, 2016 12:02 pm

http://www.dailyclimate.org/" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;


 The Daily Climate
The newest way to clean the atmosphere? Make bleach.
By Eric Roston Bloomberg News Jul 21
Not only can scientists take carbon dioxide out of the air; they can also turn it into a useful chemical. more…

Q&A: A North Dakotan who has Trump’s ear on energy.
By Kathiann M. Kowalski Midwest Energy News Jul 21
North Dakota Rep. Kevin Cramer, who has emerged as one of Donald Trump’s key advisers, explains what he means by a "level playing field" for energy." more…

Local efforts to save coral reefs may be futile.
By John Upton Climate Central Jul 21
Corals in remote and relatively pristine reefs fare little better overall amid global warming than those growing alongside heavily populated coastlines, according to research published Wednesday. more…

Blazing hot first half of 2016 sends climate records tumbling.
By Zahra Hirji InsideClimate News Jul 21
Scientists from NASA and NOAA say the first six months of the year have been the hottest ever. It comes as no surprise in sizzling Alaska. more…

The GOP’s policy on climate change is moving much more slowly than the thermometer.

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Re: Heat is Online

Postby msfreeh » Sun Jul 24, 2016 12:29 pm

Climate change
‘World can’t afford to silence us’: black church leaders address climate change
One of the largest and oldest black churches in the US warns that black people are disproportionally harmed by global warming and fossil fuel pollution


https://www.theguardian.com/environment ... nge-letter" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;

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Re: Heat is Online

Postby msfreeh » Tue Jul 26, 2016 1:50 pm

Straddling Solutions and Survivalism




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Straddling Solutions and Survivalism
(Talk at Mass. Climate Action Network Conference:  Nov. 19)
         
          Those of you that have heard me talk before will be relieved to know I'm not going to go through a catalogue of new impacts or weather events like the 1-in-200-year rainstorm this spring that left $100 million in damages in three mid-Atlantic states.  Or the startling jump in polar bear mortality the USGS reported the other day.
 
          Instead I'd like to use some of this afternoon's talk to remind you why even the most climate-conscious officials feel frustrated by the lack of public support for significant emissions reductions -- I want you to know what you're up against -- and also what I see as the most promising strategic approach for local activists. 
 
          And, along the way, I'll throw in a pitch for a set of macro-level, global-scale solutions which, if nature would allow us time to implement them, could achieve the 75 percent reduction in carbon emissions and, at the same time, provide the basis for a much wealthier, more stable and more secure world.
 
          But I'd like to start with a couple of anecdotes that illustrate how profoundly out of step with the rest of the world we are.  
 
          Last summer, right after Katrina hit the Gulf coast, I published an op-ed article in the Boston Globe titled, "Katrina's Real Name."  The piece linked global warming to higher sea surface temperatures which, of course, fuel more intense hurricanes.  And it put Katrina in the context of lots of other extreme weather events which constitute a hallmark of early-stage global warming.
 
          The piece proved to be somewhat controversial.  I got a bit of flak for it -- and ended up doing something like 40 radio interviews in the following two weeks.
          About two months later, there came to Boston a group of German news editors -- from high profile publications like Der Spiegel, Stern and German Public Radio.  The editors invited me to meet with them to discuss journalistic issues involved in covering the climate issue.  And before the meeting, the organizer of the tour gave the editors copies of the Katrina op-ed.  About half way through our conversation, two of these editors spontaneously held up copies of the op-ed and one said:  "Mr. Gelbspan, no disrespect intended, but we have no idea why you published this article.  There's absolutely nothing new here.  Why did you waste the newsprint to tell us what we already know?"  It was like, "Welcome to our world."
 
          Similarly, when I was invited to speak at Oxford University in September, I prepared an overview of the climate crisis.  But before I gave the talk, my hosts made it clear most, if not all, of the audience knew at least as much as I do about the situation. What they really wanted to know was why the American public -- and the Bush Administration in particular -- are so blind to the urgency of the climate crisis.  
 
          What shocked both the German and British audiences is the extent to which industry money dominates our national political process and the degree to which it has distorted news coverage -- at least in the climate area. Such a profound contamination of our political process by industry money apparently is not a part of their own civic experience -- at least not when it involves issues of truly monumental consequence.
 
          That is evident from  the fact that Holland, the U.K., Germany and France have vowed to cut their emissions from 50 to 80 percent over the next 45 years -- in keeping with the dictates of the science.
 
          So I think one take-home message here for those of you who are working with local officials is that If significant change is going to happen at all, it's going to have to percolate from up from the grassroots into the national consciousness.
          This puts a difficult -- and an unfair -- burden on your shoulders.  But it also puts those of you working at the local level in a particularly strategic position.
 
          For one thing, most of you will not have operatives from the carbon lobby putting their fingers in your eyes.  While big coal and big oil and have paralyzed action at the national level, they just don't have enough foot soldiers to stifle action in localities around the country.  
 
          Moreover, it's easier to get access to smaller local media outlets.  And if you explain to local reporters the bigger picture about why you're working to make your city or town Kyoto-compliant, that is a great way to link what you're doing locally to what's going on around the world.
 
          For example: we all know that climate change hits poor countries hardest.  So as you succeed in reducing carbon emissions in Watertown, you are also helping lessen the impacts on people halfway around the world whose crops are destroyed by weather extremes, whose homelands are going under from rising sea levels and whose borders are becoming overrun by environmental refugees.
 
          But I very much want you to understand that whatever kind of reductions you can make in your own town's carbon footprint are less important for emissions avoided than they are for the political awareness they can create. It's not enough to reduce emissions.  You need to let people know -- loudly and clearly -- why you're doing it.
 
          As promised, I won't rehearse all the climate impacts and scientific findings that are surfacing almost on a weekly basis in the literature. But I would like to frame this talk with a couple of large-gauge observations about global climate change.
 
          The first is its speed.  We have all been absolutely blindsided by global warming.  Global warming didn't even surface as an issue in the public arena until 1988.  That was the year the UN first began to put in place the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change.  That same year, 1988, was the year that NASA Scientist Jim Hansen went before Congress to testify that "global warming is at hand."
 
          Today, a mere 18 years later, scientists are telling us that we are approaching -- or are already at -- a point of no return in terms of staving off climate chaos.  That is an incredibly short period of time -- the blink of an eye historically speaking -- for such enormous changes in these massive planetary systems.  As Harvard's Dr. Paul Epstein said, "We are seeing impacts now that we didn't expect to see until 2085." 
 
          The second point -- which presents one of the most difficult aspects of the challenge -- has to do with lagtimes and feedbacks.  Carbon dioxide stays up the atmosphere for about 100 years.  So many of the impacts we are already seeing are probably the result of emissions we put up in the 1970s and 1980s -- just as China and India were beginning to accelerate their surge of coal-fired industrialization.  This makes it virtually inevitable that we will see many more events of the magnitude of Katrina and the European heat wave of 2003.
 
          The issue is further compounded, as you know, by the existence of feedbacks in which small changes in certain planetary systems trigger much larger changes in other systems.  For example, the tundra in Siberia and Canada for thousands of years has absorbed methane and carbon dioxide, locking them into the frozen terrain. Now, however, those areas are beginning to thaw and release those gases back into the atmosphere -- which could well trigger a new spike of heating.
 
          The final point involves the extreme sensitivity of earth's systems to just a tiny bit of warming.  As you all know, the glaciers are melting, the deep oceans are heating, violent weather is increasing, the timing of the seasons is changing and all over the world plants, birds, insects, fish and animals are migrating toward the poles in search of stable temperatures. And all that has resulted from one degree of warming.  And for context we are looking forward to a century of 4 to 10 degrees more heat. 
 
          What we need is a rapid worldwide switch to non-carbon energy -- wind, solar, tidal and wave power, biofuels and, ultimately, hydrogen fuels.  And we need it yesterday.
 
          That does not mean we will all have to sit in the dark and ride bicycles. Those sources can give us all the energy we need even as they would make the human enterprise far more compatible with the requirements of a stable species home.
 
          The fossil fuel lobby knows this perhaps better than anyone else.  And its response has been to protect the industry at the expense of the rest of us in general -- and, more specifically, at the expense of the lifeblood of any democratic system which is honest information.
 
          For more than a decade, the fossil fuel lobby has mounted an extremely effective campaign of deception and disinformation, almost exclusively in the U.S., to persuade the public and policy-makers that the issue of atmospheric warming is still stuck in the limbo of scientific uncertainty. That campaign for the longest time targeted the science. And in so doing, it marginalized the findings of more than 2,000 scientists from 100 countries reporting to the U.N. in what is the largest and most rigorously peer-reviewed scientific collaboration in history. It then misrepresented the economics of an energy transition. And most recently, with its champion in the White House, it has attempted to demolish the diplomatic foundations of the climate convention.  And it has been extremely successful in maintaining a relentless drumbeat of doubt in the public mind.
 
          From the perspective of an investigative reporter, the central drama underlying this issue is crystal clear. It pits the ability of this planet to sustain civilization versus the survival of one of the largest commercial enterprises in human history. The oil and coal industries together generate more than a trillion dollars a year in revenues. In this battle, their resources are virtually without limit. 
 
          A few recent examples.
 
          In the mid-1990s, the coal industry launched a disinformation offensive using a few greenhouse skeptics -- three of whom received about a million dollars in industry money under the table in a three-year period which was never publicly disclosed until we published it.  The campaign featured a $250,000 video designed to persuade us that global warming is good for us.  That was in the mid-1990s.
 
          What you need to understand  is that these people are extremely persistent. 
 
          We obtained a new memo this July from a group of coal companies about the launch of yet another covert disinformation campaign -- producing a major movie to counter Al Gore's film, increasing the carbon industry's support for Sen. James Inhofe, from Oklahoma, who calls global warming "the greatest hoax ever perpetrated on the American people" and raising hundreds of thousands more dollars to buy more air time for more skeptics.
 
          This manufactured denial is by far the biggest obstacle facing all of us at work on this issue.  Launched a decade ago by the coal industry, it has been carried forward more recently by the oil industry which spent more than $15 million since 1998 to bankroll these skeptics and their institutions.
 
          ExxonMobil has been an especially active player in this game. In 2001, the head of the ICCC, Dr. Robert Watson, suggested the US was doing less than it might to address global warming.  In response, ExxonMobil sent a memo to President Bush telling him to get rid of Watson. In short order, Watson was out of a job.
 
          Just days after the Bush Administration took office in 2001, Lee Raymond, then CEO of ExxonMobil, had a private meeting with Vice President Cheney to discuss the composition of his energy task force. The group ultimately included representatives of every major coal and oil company -- and not one member of the environmental community.
 
          ExxonMobil also made clear in a series of ads on the op-ed pages of the New York Times, that it was vehemently opposed to any US involvement with the Kyoto Protocol. 
 
          Behind the scenes, the company engineered the appointment of an oil-friendly operative, Harlan Watson, to be the Administration's chief climate negotiator. Whereupon Watson promptly announced that the US would not join the Kyoto process for at least a decade -- if at all.  
 
          And when President Bush formally did withdraw the US from Kyoto, the White House sent several notes thanking ExxonMobil for its "active involvement" in helping determine the administration's climate policies.
 
          The oil industry's influence on the Administration's climate and energy policies surfaced again last year. Early in his administration, President Bush appointed Phil Cooney, an official of the American Petroleum Institute, to head up the White House climate office.  Last year, Cooney was found to have personally altered a major scientific report on coming climate impacts in the U.S., deleting and softening references to the dangers of climate change.  When his hand-altered document was provided to the press, a public outcry forced Cooney to resign from the White House.  A few days later, he was hired by ExxonMobil.
 
          As recently as four months ago, the company took another step to further distort public policy.  At the beginning of the year, a group of 86 Evangelical ministers had urged strong action on global warming to help preserve God's creation -- and to protect the world's poorest and most vulnerable residents from the ravages of climate change.
 
          That was followed, in July, by a statement by a different group of evangelical organizations proclaiming climate change is God's will and downplaying its severity.  It turns out the fundamentalist groups that formed the core of this new coalition received $2.5 million in funding from ExxonMobil.
 
          And last month, Exxon's recently-retired CEO Lee Raymond was appointed by President Bush to head up a new panel to determine America's energy future.
 
          In short, the White House has become the East Coast branch office of ExxonMobil and Peabody Coal -- and climate change has become the preeminent case study of the contamination of our political process with money.
 
          This fusion of corporate interests with government power has proved an almost insurmountable obstacle to the climate movement's ability to get its larger message across.
 
          So I think the really critical focus for climate activists should be on the press. I know from my own experience that, were the press to cover this issue thoroughly and consistently, that would mobilize the public in six months. 
 
          Unfortunately the industry public relations specialists have  been so successful in promoting equivocal and confusing climate coverage that the American public is at least 10 years behind the rest of the world in understanding the magnitude and urgency of the issue.
 
          There are a number of reasons for this none of them, given the magnitude of the story, justifiable.            
 
          One reason, I think, involves the fact that the career path to the top at news outlets normally lies in following the track of political reporting.  Top editors tend to see all issues through a political lens.  
 
          Let me mention just one -- out of scores -- of recent examples:
 
          Prior to his withdrawal from Kyoto, President Bush declared he would not accept the findings of the IPCC because they represented foreign science (even though about half of the 2,000 scientists who contribute to the IPCC are American.)  Instead, Bush called on the U.S. National Academy of Sciences to provide American science.
 
          What I found astounding was this.  Even as the Washington press corps reported this story, not one reporter bothered to check the position of the NAS.  Had they done so, they would have found that as early as 1992, three years before the IPCC determined that humans are changing the climate, the NAS was pushing for strong measures to minimize the impacts of human-induced global warming.
 
          So thats just a quick nod to the culture of journalism which is, basically, a political culture which is not particularly hospitable in fact, I think it's institutionally arrogant -- toward non-political areas of coverage.
 
          The next reason has to do with this campaign of disinformation launched by the coal industry and most recently carried forward by ExxonMobil.  As I mentioned, the fossil fuel lobby paid a tiny handful of scientists virtually all of whom had no standing in the mainstream scientific community to dismiss the reality of climate change. That campaign has had a profoundly corrosive effect on journalists by insisting the issue of climate change be cast as a debate -- when, in fact, there is no debate in the community of mainstream climate scientists. 
 
For the longest time, the press accorded the same weight to he "skeptics" as it did to mainstream scientists. This was done in the name of journalistic balance.  In fact, it represented journalistic laziness. 
         
          The ethic of journalistic balance comes into play when there is a story involving opinion:  Should society sanction gay marriage? Should abortion be legal?  Should we withdraw our troops from Iraq? When a story involves opinion, a journalist is ethically obligated to give each major competing view its most articulate presentation and roughly equal space.
 
          But when its a question of fact, its up to a reporter to get off her or his butt and find out what the facts are.  The issue of balance is not relevant when the focus of a story is factual.
 
          Granted there have been a few credentialed scientists although only Dick Lindzen comes to mind -- who have published in the peer-reviewed literature and who minimize climate change as relatively inconsequential. 
 
In that case, if a journalist wants her or his coverage to be balanced, the story should reflect the weight of opinion in the scientific community -- and that means that the mainstream climate scientists would get 90 percent of the story and the dissenters would get a couple of paragraphs at the end. 
 
Today, that is finally beginning to happen -- although very belatedly. 
 
As one co-chair of the IPCC told me:  "There is no debate among any statured scientists working on this issue about the larger trends of what is happening to the climate." That is something you would never know from US press coverage.  
 
But it is something you should point out to every editor and reporter you encounter as you work to get your message out. Stop approaching reporters like beggars, asking for a handout.  Let them know how angry you are at them for allowing themselves to be conned into betraying their public trust.
         
          One researcher, who surveyed more than 900 peer-reviewed research articles two years ago

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Re: Heat is Online

Postby msfreeh » Tue Aug 02, 2016 9:31 am

https://robertscribbler.com/2016/08/01/ ... te-change/" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;

Ellicott City Flood — 1,000 Year Event Looks a Lot Like One of the Rain Bombs of Climate Change
We live in a strange new world, one in which the familiar is all mixed up with the radically altered. Such was the case this weekend when a weather pattern that was pretty normal for summer spawned a single thunderstorm that produced a once-in-a-thousand-years flood event in Ellicott City.

Normal Weekend, Typical Weather Pattern, Abnormal Conditions

On Saturday, my wife and I readied to trek out to Shenandoah National Park for a happily-anticipated summer camping trip. As we headed out the door, the weather pattern looked mostly normal for summer, if a little stormy. A high-pressure system out over the ocean was pulling in moisture off its waters and drawing warm air up from the south. A low over western Pennsylvania and a warm frontal boundary over Maryland created instability in a big zone of convection from Northern Virginia on through to Connecticut. Overall, it was a pretty typical pattern that would probably have produced some moderate-to-strong late-afternoon thunderstorms back in the 20th century. Back then, it was far less likely that a similar pattern would have produced a 1,000 year flood event.



(Extremely warm sea surface temperatures on the weekend of July 30-31 helped to fuel the record rainfall event over Elicott City, Maryland. Sea surface temperature anomaly map provided by: Earth Nullschool.)

However, conditions were not normal, not the same as they were back during a time when human fossil-fuel emissions hadn’t forced the world to warm by 1.2 degrees Celsius above 1880s levels. In the new world in 2016, the ocean high-pressure system was circulating over record warm sea surfaces that were 3-5 C hotter than late 20th-century averages. And because of this, the ocean was bleeding off a whole hell of a lot more moisture than it typically would. Any storms that fired in that very wet air mass would, as a result, tend to pump out a lot more rain than is typical.

A Wet Atmosphere Crackling with Unusual Energy

As my wife and I made our way toward the Blue Ridge Mountains and down Interstate 66 and Route 211, large, energetic cumulus clouds sprouted all around us. Wafted in the hot, unstable air, many tops punched up through the troposphere, spreading out into the characteristic anvil shapes of thunderstorms.

Light streamed down between these big, wet beasts. For a while, as we made our way up to the campground, set up our gear, and took a hike along a local rock scramble, we were fortunate — able to enjoy our day despite the loud rumbles and roars of thunder echoing up from the valleys or off the nearby mountainsides in the steamy, moisture-choked air.



(A massive amount of atmospheric moisture fueled powerful thunderstorms on Saturday, July 30 from the Appalachians of northwestern Virginia to the Baltimore City region. One of these storms dumped more than 4.5 inches of rain on Ellicott City, Maryland Saturday in just one hour. Image source: Terp Weather.)

At about 3,000 feet in elevation, these conditions were a bit odd for Shenandoah National Park which typically experiences milder weather. Temperatures were around 80 degrees Fahrenheit (about 5-6 F hotter than average), and the level of atmospheric moist

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Re: Heat is Online

Postby msfreeh » Mon Aug 08, 2016 9:10 am

Climate Change Solutions in Maine
Fwd: [multi-issue] FW: Photos/Stories of Maine Climate Solutions Needed for Film
Aug 8, 2016, 10:03 AM
From sam f brown
Details
D​DATTers, here is an interesting request.  Can we connect some good projects in our area with some good photograph(er)s?  It's surprising how little our legislators and fellow citizens really know about what's going on in the literal grass roots, so let's help show them...​


Photos/Stories of Maine Climate Solutions Needed for Film

The Maine-based Down to Earth ClimateJustice Storytelling Project (DTE), which completed a full-length film in May featuring 13 Maine climate activists of all ages and backgrounds, is launching a new film project and needs your help. DTE is working in partnership with Maine environmental and social change groups and individuals on the project. 

The idea for the new film is to capture climate solutions that are already underway in every corner of Maine. DTE will put photos together into a fast-paced, 5-minute film that can be shared with Maine legislators and the general public through YouTube. Each legislator will be presented with a DVD containing the short film, and a card with background stories of solutions from their own constituent communities. The thought behind this project is that stories can change hearts and the pictures of Maine communities and citizens already adopting climate solutions can inspire others to do similar actions and introduce/support public policies that foster sustainability across Maine. The plan is to complete the film and story handout by early December, well ahead of the next legislative session.

DTE needs your help! Please take and email us good quality photographs that depict Maine solutions from your area. The photos might show a community solar farm, residential pv or solar heat system, municipal solar installation, community wind, community gardens, front lawn vegetable garden, innovative energy efficiency/renewable energy production projects, alternative transportation projects such as bike trails, trolleys, trains, electric cars/bikes, electric charging stations, etc. 
Photos should ideally be high resolution (1920 x 1080 pixels or higher but twice that size would be even better for the videographer to work with). Basically the bigger the picture, the better!  If you take a picture of a unique solution that is not as high quality, DTE may still be able to use it.

Email photos to DTE at downtoearth145@gmail.com. Please include the name of the Maine community where the photo was taken. If you can provide more background information about the photo...even a short paragraph that could be included in the handout that will accompany the film...that would be a bonus. And please include your name so we can give you credit for your photograph(s). 

The Down to Earth Climate Justice Storytelling Project was founded in 2014 by community organizer Anne D. (Andy) Burt to bring activists’ stories into the mainstream where they might change hearts and inspire actions. The project is funded by the Eleanor Humes Haney Fund, the Lyman Fund, and an Indiegogo crowdfunding campaign. Resources for Organizingand Social Change (ROSC) is the fiscal agent for the project.

Please help us capture on film Maine’s climate solutions and seed inspiration for more!

Down to Earth Project, POB 145, Edgecomb, ME  04556…www.downtoearthstories.org

msfreeh
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Re: Heat is Online

Postby msfreeh » Tue Aug 09, 2016 11:16 am

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Hot Gulf of Mexico Hurls Rain Bombs at Florida and the U.S. Gulf Coast
Rain bomb. It’s a new kind of severe rainstorm that’s capable of overwhelming a city’s flood-handling capabilities in just an hour or two. Of generating 2-inch-plus per hour rainfall events in odd places and at unexpected times. A type of severe storm that’s been enabled by all the added heat and atmospheric moisture loading resulting from human-forced climate change.

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(High levels of atmospheric water vapor over the northeastern Gulf of Mexico is fueling the potential for severe, damaging and life-threatening rainfall events across the Gulf Coast this week even as numerous severe flood events occur across the globe. Image source: Earth Nullschool.)

Lately, due in large part to an atmosphere and ocean surface that’s about 1.2 degrees Celsius hotter than 1880s values and related added atmospheric moisture, the powerful, damaging, and life-threatening rain bombs have been going off hard and heavy across the globe. Last week, Ellicott City was hit, killing one and generating damage that will likely take years to repair. Yesterday, about 21 people lost their lives in a freak flood that dumped 20 inches of rain over part of Macedonia. In Sudan on Saturday, the Nile reached its highest levels in 100 years as thousands of homes were destroyed and more than 75 people lost their lives. In Karachi, Pakistan this weekend, 50 percent of the city is without power and ten people have lost their lives due to flooding. In India over the past two weeks, more than one million people have been displaced and 100 killed in devastating floods. And now, a very hot Gulf of Mexico appears to be hurling a number of similarly powerful storms at the U.S. Gulf Coast.

Severe Gulf Rainstorms Begin

There’s a hell of a lot of heat and moisture available to fuel storms over the Gulf of Mexico right now. And this region where ocean surfaces exceed 90 degrees Fahrenheit (running from 30 to 33 C, or 1 to 3 C above average) over a broad swath is just now starting to toss some extremely powerful rain bombs at nearby states.



(26 inches of rain fell over a portion of the Gulf of Mexico in one 24-hour period just west of northern Florida. Over the coming week, this moisture is expected to shift northward over Lousiana, Mississippi, and the Florida Panhandle. Image source: Jesse Ferrell at Accuweather.)

Strong convection is blowing up from the hot surface of these waters and exploding into thunderstorms. Already, big rain bombs are starting to fall out over the Gulf or streaming onto shore. As of yesterday, one of these systems produced more than 26 inches of rain in just one 12-hour period. That’s an average of about 2.2 inches of rainfall per hour for 12 hours running, an amount of water that would cause extremely severe flooding if it fell on a U.S. city.

Today, these rain bombs began roaring ashore over the Florida Panhandle. A series of such systems dumped 20 inches of rain near Dekle Beach, Florida even as powerful storms firing near Pinland and Perry dropped 16 inches.



(Earlier today, 20 inches of rain fell near Dekle Beach, Florida even as totals near 16 inches fell between Pinland and Perry. Image source: Jesse Ferrell at Accuweather.)

To be clear, these are just thunderstorms associated with a very hot and moist weather pattern over the Gulf — but they’re producing rainfall amounts usually seen in strong tropical cyclones. Meanwhile, National Weather Service radar shows strong storms continuing to cycle into this region of Florida even as south Florida is hammered by heavy storms and intense squalls swirl over the western Panhandle, Alabama, and Mississippi.

More Severe Rain on the Way, but the Rain Bombs Themselves are Tough to Predict

Over the coming week, the potential for continued heavy storms is high. NOAA’s precipitation forecast model shows rainfall potentials for the region in the range of 5-10 inches for some locations over the coming week. It’s worth noting, however, that NOAA model runs have often not captured the full potential peak rainfall totals in some recent severe events. To this point, it’s also worth noting that forecasting rain bombs can be difficult, particularly so during recent years. Monitors like NOAA can track the underlying conditions, but it’s generally tough to see exactly where the big precipitation spike will occur until perhaps a few hours before the rain starts falling.

Part of this prediction difficulty is likely due to the fact that the added atmospheric moisture loading — 8 percent since the 1880s and 5 percent since the late 1970s — due to global warming has increased instability to the point where new, and less well understood, types of weather are being generated. These days, there are new kinds of thunderstorms ranging the globe, and there’s a lot we don’t understand about them.

Links:

Jesse Ferrell at Accuweather

NOAA Rainfall Prediction

Earth Nullschool

The Macedonia Flood

Four Major Floods Taking Place Right This Second

20 Inches of Rain in One D


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