Heat is Online

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msfreeh
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Heat is Online

Postby msfreeh » Fri Feb 01, 2013 9:55 pm

see link for full story
http://www.counterpunch.org/2013/02/01/ ... n-schools/" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;

February 1-3, 2013

ALEC Bill in Three States To Require Climate Change Denial In Schools
by STEVE HORN

The American Legislative Exchange Council (ALEC) - known by its critics as a “corporate bill mill” – has hit the ground running in 2013, pushing “models bills” mandating the teaching of climate change denial in public school systems.

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msfreeh
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Re: Heat is Online

Postby msfreeh » Sat Feb 02, 2013 10:28 am

http://www.heatisonline.org" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;

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Re: Heat is Online

Postby msfreeh » Sat Feb 02, 2013 12:04 pm

Saturday, 02 February 2013 18:53
Ozone hole changes ocean flow

http://www.collapsenet.com/free-resourc ... ocean-flow" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;

msfreeh
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Re: Heat is Online

Postby msfreeh » Sat Feb 02, 2013 1:34 pm

see link for how many feet your brain is above sea level.


Groundhog Decade: We’re Stuck In A Movie Where It’s Always the Hottest Decade On Record

By Joe Romm on Feb 2, 2013 at 10:30 am

http://thinkprogress.org/climate/2013/0 ... ?mobile=nc" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;

msfreeh
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Re: Heat is Online

Postby msfreeh » Sun Feb 03, 2013 7:40 pm

http://www.climatecentral.org/" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;


Who We Are

An independent organization of leading scientists and journalists researching and reporting the facts about our changing climate and its impact on the American public.

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mes5464
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Re: Heat is Online

Postby mes5464 » Sun Feb 03, 2013 7:43 pm

msfreeh wrote:see link for full story
http://www.counterpunch.org/2013/02/01/ ... n-schools/" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;

February 1-3, 2013

ALEC Bill in Three States To Require Climate Change Denial In Schools
by STEVE HORN

The American Legislative Exchange Council (ALEC) - known by its critics as a “corporate bill mill” – has hit the ground running in 2013, pushing “models bills” mandating the teaching of climate change denial in public school systems.
The public education system is nothing but an indoctrination center.

msfreeh
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Re: Heat is Online

Postby msfreeh » Mon Feb 04, 2013 1:32 pm

http://www.countercurrents.org/index.htm" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;

msfreeh
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Re: Heat is Online

Postby msfreeh » Mon Feb 04, 2013 1:41 pm

mes5464 wrote:
msfreeh wrote:see link for full story
http://www.counterpunch.org/2013/02/01/ ... n-schools/" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;

February 1-3, 2013

ALEC Bill in Three States To Require Climate Change Denial In Schools
by STEVE HORN

The American Legislative Exchange Council (ALEC) - known by its critics as a “corporate bill mill” – has hit the ground running in 2013, pushing “models bills” mandating the teaching of climate change denial in public school systems.
The public education system is nothing but an indoctrination center.

The Six-Lesson Schoolteacher

by John Taylor Gatto, New York State Teacher of the Year, 1991





Call me Mr. Gatto, please. Twenty-six years ago, having nothing better to do, I tried my hand at schoolteaching. My license certifies me as an instructor of English language and literature, but that isn't what I do at all. What I teach is school, and I win awards doing it.

Teaching means many different things, but six lessons are common to schoolteaching from Harlem to Hollywood. You pay for these lessons in more ways than you can imagine, so you might as well know what they are:

The first lesson I teach is: "Stay in the class where you belong." I don't know who decides that my kids belong there but that's not my business. The children are numbered so that if any get away they can be returned to the right class. Over the years the variety of ways children are numbered has increased dramatically, until it is hard to see the human being under the burden of the numbers each carries. Numbering children is a big and very profitable business, though what the business is designed to accomplish is elusive.

In any case, again, that's not my business. My job is to make the kids like it -- being locked in together, I mean -- or at the minimum, endure it. If things go well, the kids can't imagine themselves anywhere else; they envy and fear the better classes and have contempt for the dumber classes. So the class mostly keeps itself in good marching order. That's the real lesson of any rigged competition like school. You come to know your place.

Nevertheless, in spite of the overall blueprint, I make an effort to urge children to higher levels of test success, promising eventual transfer from the lower-level class as a reward. I insinuate that the day will come when an employer will hire them on the basis of test scores, even though my own experience is that employers are (rightly) indifferent to such things. I never lie outright, but I've come to see that truth and [school]teaching are incompatible.

The lesson of numbered classes is that there is no way out of your class except by magic. Until that happens you must stay where you are put.

The second lesson I teach kids is to turn on and off like a light switch. I demand that they become totally involved in my lessons, jumping up and down in their seats with anticipation, competing vigorously with each other for my favor. But when the bell rings I insist that they drop the work at once and proceed quickly to the next work station. Nothing important is ever finished in my class, nor in any other class I know of.

The lesson of bells is that no work is worth finishing, so why care too deeply about anything? Bells are the secret logic of schooltime; their argument is inexorable; bells destroy past and future, converting every interval into a sameness, as an abstract map makes every living mountain and river the same even though they are not. Bells inoculate each undertaking with indifference.

The third lesson I teach you is to surrender your will to a predestined chain of command. Rights may be granted or withheld, by authority, without appeal. As a schoolteacher I intervene in many personal decisions, issuing a Pass for those I deem legitimate, or initiating a disciplinary confrontation for behavior that threatens my control. My judgments come thick and fast, because individuality is trying constantly to assert itself in my classroom. Individuality is a curse to all systems of classification, a contradiction of class theory.

Here are some common ways it shows up: children sneak away for a private moment in the toilet on the pretext of moving their bowels; they trick me out of a private instant in the hallway on the grounds that they need water. Sometimes free will appears right in front of me in children angry, depressed or exhilarated by things outside my ken. Rights in such things cannot exist for schoolteachers; only privileges, which can be withdrawn, exist.

The fourth lesson I teach is that only I determine what curriculum you will study. (Rather, I enforce decisions transmitted by the people who pay me). This power lets me separate good kids from bad kids instantly. Good kids do the tasks I appoint with a minimum of conflict and a decent show of enthusiasm. Of the millions of things of value to learn, I decide what few we have time for. The choices are mine. Curiosity has no important place in my work, only conformity.

Bad kids fight against this, of course, trying openly or covertly to make decisions for themselves about what they will learn. How can we allow that and survive as schoolteachers? Fortunately there are procedures to break the will of those who resist.

This is another way I teach the lesson of dependency. Good people wait for a teacher to tell them what to do. This is the most important lesson of all, that we must wait for other people, better trained than ourselves, to make the meanings of our lives. It is no exaggeration to say that our entire economy depends upon this lesson being learned. Think of what would fall apart if kids weren't trained in the dependency lesson: The social-service businesses could hardly survive, including the fast-growing counseling industry; commercial entertainment of all sorts, along with television, would wither if people remembered how to make their own fun; the food services, restaurants and prepared-food warehouses would shrink if people returned to making their own meals rather than depending on strangers to cook for them. Much of modern law, medicine, and engineering would go too -- the clothing business as well -- unless a guaranteed supply of helpless people poured out of our schools each year. We've built a way of life that depends on people doing what they are told because they don't know any other way. For God's sake, let's not rock that boat!

In lesson five I teach that your self-respect should depend on an observer's measure of your worth. My kids are constantly evaluated and judged. A monthly report, impressive in its precision, is sent into students' homes to spread approval or to mark exactly -- down to a single percentage point -- how dissatisfied with their children parents should be. Although some people might be surprised how little time or reflection goes into making up these records, the cumulative weight of the objective- seeming documents establishes a profile of defect which compels a child to arrive at a certain decisions about himself and his future based on the casual judgment of strangers.

Self-evaluation -- the staple of every major philosophical system that ever appeared on the planet -- is never a factor in these things. The lesson of report cards, grades, and tests is that children should not trust themselves or their parents, but must rely on the evaluation of certified officials. People need to be told what they are worth.

In lesson six I teach children that they are being watched. I keep each student under constant surveillance and so do my colleagues. There are no private spaces for children; there is no private time. Class change lasts 300 seconds to keep promiscuous fraternization at low levels. Students are encouraged to tattle on each other, even to tattle on their parents. Of course I encourage parents to file their own child's waywardness, too.

I assign "homework" so that this surveillance extends into the household, where students might otherwise use the time to learn something unauthorized, perhaps from a father or mother, or by apprenticing to some wiser person in the neighborhood.

The lesson of constant surveillance is that no one can be trusted, that privacy is not legitimate. Surveillance is an ancient urgency among certain influential thinkers; it was a central prescription set down by Calvin in the Institutes, by Plato in the Republic, by Hobbes, by Comte, by Francis Bacon. All these childless men discovered the same thing: Children must be closely watched if you want to keep a society under central control.

It is the great triumph of schooling that among even the best of my fellow teachers, and among even the best parents, there is only a small number who can imagine a different way to do things. Yet only a very few lifetimes ago things were different in the United States: originality and variety were common currency; our freedom from regimentation made us the miracle of the world; social class boundaries were relatively easy to cross; our citizenry was marvelously confident, inventive, and able to do many things independently, to think for themselves. We were something, all by ourselves, as individuals.

It only takes about 50 contact hours to transmit basic literacy and math skills well enough that kids can be self-teachers from then on. The cry for "basic skills" practice is a smokescreen behind which schools pre-empt the time of children for twelve years and teach them the six lessons I've just taught you.

We've had a society increasingly under central control in the United States since just before the Civil War: the lives we lead, the clothes we wear, the food we eat, and the green highway signs we drive by from coast to coast are the products of this central control. So, too, I think, are the epidemics of drugs, suicide, divorce, violence, cruelty, and the hardening of class into caste in the U.S., products of the dehumanization of our lives, the lessening of individual and family importance that central control imposes.

Without a fully active role in community life you cannot develop into a complete human being. Aristotle taught that. Surely he was right; look around you or look in the mirror: that is the demonstration.

"School" is an essential support system for a vision of social engineering that condemns most people to be subordinate stones in a pyramid that narrows to a control point as it ascends. "School" is an artifice which makes such a pyramidal social order seem inevitable (although such a premise is a fundamental betrayal of the American Revolution). In colonial days and through the period of the early Republic we had no schools to speak of. And yet the promise of democracy was beginning to be realized. We turned our backs on this promise by bringing to life the ancient dream of Egypt: compulsory training in subordination for everybody. Compulsory schooling was the secret Plato reluctantly transmitted in the Republic when he laid down the plans for total state control of human life.

The current debate about whether we should have a national curriculum is phony; we already have one, locked up in the six lessons I've told you about and a few more I've spared you. This curriculum produces moral and intellectual paralysis, and no curriculum of content will be sufficient to reverse its bad effects. What is under discussion is a great irrelevancy.

None of this is inevitable, you know. None of it is impregnable to change. We do have a choice in how we bring up young people; there is no right way. There is no "international competition" that compels our existence, difficult as it is to even think about in the face of a constant media barrage of myth to the contrary. In every important material respect our nation is self-sufficient. If we gained a non-material philosophy that found meaning where it is genuinely located -- in families, friends, the passage of seasons, in nature, in simple ceremonies and rituals, in curiosity, generosity, compassion, and service to others, in a decent independence and privacy -- then we would be truly self-sufficient.

How did these awful places, these "schools", come about? As we know them, they are a product of the two "Red Scares" of 1848 and 1919, when powerful interests feared a revolution among our industrial poor, and partly they are the result of the revulsion with which old-line families regarded the waves of Celtic, Slavic, and Latin immigration -- and the Catholic religion -- after 1845. And certainly a third contributing cause can be found in the revulsion with which these same families regarded the free movement of Africans through the society after the Civil War.

Look again at the six lessons of school. This is training for permanent underclasses, people who are to be deprived forever of finding the center of their own special genius. And it is training shaken loose from its original logic: to regulate the poor. Since the 1920s the growth of the well-articulated school bureaucracy, and the less visible growth of a horde of industries that profit from schooling exactly as it is, have enlarged schooling's original grasp to seize the sons and daughters of the middle class.

Is it any wonder Socrates was outraged at the accusation that he took money to teach? Even then, philosophers saw clearly the inevitable direction the professionalization of teaching would take, pre-empting the teaching function that belongs to all in a healthy community; belongs, indeed, most clearly to yourself, since nobody else cares as much about your destiny. Professional teaching tends to another serious error. It makes things that are inherently easy to learn, like reading, writing, and arithmetic, difficult -- by insisting they be taught by pedagogical procedures.

With lessons like the ones I teach day after day, is it any wonder we have the national crisis we face today? Young people indifferent to the adult world and to the future; indifferent to almost everything except the diversion of toys and violence? Rich or poor, schoolchildren cannot concentrate on anything for very long. They have a poor sense of time past and to come; they are mistrustful of intimacy (like the children of divorce they really are); they hate solitude, are cruel, materialistic, dependent, passive, violent, timid in the face of the unexpected, addicted to distraction.

All the peripheral tendencies of childhood are magnified to a grotesque extent by schooling, whose hidden curriculum prevents effective personality development. Indeed, without exploiting the fearfulness, selfishness, and inexperience of children our schools could not survive at all, nor could I as a certified schoolteacher.

"Critical thinking" is a term we hear frequently these days as a form of training which will herald a new day in mass schooling. It certainly will, if it ever happens. No common school that actually dared teach the use of dialectic, heuristic, and other tools of free minds could last a year without being torn to pieces.

Institutional schoolteachers are destructive to children's development. Nobody survives the Six-Lesson Curriculum unscathed, not even the instructors. The method is deeply and profoundly anti-educational. No tinkering will fix it. In one of the great ironies of human affairs, the massive rethinking that schools require would cost so much less than we are spending now that it is not likely to happen. First and foremost, the business I am in is a jobs project and a contract-letting agency. We cannot afford to save money, not even to help children.

At the pass we've come to historically, and after 26 years of teaching, I must conclude that one of the only alternatives on the horizon for most families is to teach their own children at home. Small, de- institutionalized schools are another. Some form of free-market system for public schooling is the likeliest place to look for answers. But the near impossibility of these things for the shattered families of the poor, and for too many on the fringes of the economic middle class, foretell that the disaster of Six-Lesson Schools is likely to continue.

After an adult lifetime spent in teaching school I believe the method of schooling is the only real content it has. Don't be fooled into thinking that good curricula or good equipment or good teachers are the critical determinants of your son and daughter's schooltime. All the pathologies we've considered come about in large measure because the lessons of school prevent children from keeping important appointments with themselves and their families, to learn lessons in self-motivation, perseverance, self-reliance, courage, dignity and love -- and, of course, lessons in service to others, which are among the key lessons of home life.

Thirty years ago these things could still be learned in the time left after school. But television has eaten most of that time, and a combination of television and the stresses peculiar to two-income or single-parent families have swallowed up most of what used to be family time. Our kids have no time left to grow up fully human, and only thin-soil wastelands to do it in.

A future is rushing down upon our culture which will insist that all of us learn the wisdom of non-material experience; this future will demand, as the price of survival, that we follow a pace of natural life economical in material cost. These lessons cannot be learned in schools as they are. School is like starting life with a 12-year jail sentence in which bad habits are the only curriculum truly learned. I teach school and win awards doing it. I should know.

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Re: Heat is Online

Postby msfreeh » Fri Feb 08, 2013 12:42 am

http://www.heatisonline.org" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;

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Re: Heat is Online

Postby msfreeh » Mon Feb 11, 2013 2:05 pm

http://thinkprogress.org/climate/issue/?mobile=nc" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;

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Re: Heat is Online

Postby msfreeh » Tue Feb 12, 2013 5:27 pm

http://skepticalscience.com/" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;

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Re: Heat is Online

Postby msfreeh » Wed Feb 13, 2013 1:55 pm

Tons of Californians arrested at White House climate change protest


February 13, 2013

http://blog.sfgate.com/nov05election/20 ... e-protest/" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;

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Re: Heat is Online

Postby msfreeh » Fri Feb 15, 2013 1:19 pm

http://www.greenlandmelting.com/" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;

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Re: Heat is Online

Postby msfreeh » Fri Feb 15, 2013 2:37 pm

Friday, 15 February 2013 15:52
Secret funds helped build vast climate denial network

http://www.collapsenet.com/free-resourc ... al-network" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;

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Re: Heat is Online

Postby msfreeh » Sat Feb 16, 2013 12:49 pm

see link for full story
http://www.collapsenet.com/free-resourc ... farm-fight" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;


Saturday, 16 February 2013 15:16
Secret donors fund windfarm fight


“Conservatives used a pair of secretive trusts to fund a media campaign against windfarms and solar projects, and to block state agencies from planning for future sea-level rise, the Guardian has learned.

The trusts, Donors Trust and Donors Capital Fund, served as the bankers of the conservative movement over the past decade. Promising anonymity to their conservative billionaire patrons, the trusts between them channelled nearly $120m to contrarian thinktanks and activists, wrecking the chances of getting Congress to act on climate change.

Now the Guardian can reveal the latest project of the secretive funding network: a campaign to stop state governments moving towards renewable energy.

The campaign against wind and solar power was led by a relatively new entity, the Franklin Centre for Government and Public Integrity. The Franklin Centre did not exist before 2009, but it has quickly become a protege of Donors Trust.”

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Re: Heat is Online

Postby msfreeh » Sat Feb 16, 2013 7:57 pm

Saturday, 16 February 2013 15:10
The Most Influential Climate Science Paper Today Remains Unknown to Most People
see link for full story
http://insideclimatenews.org/news/20140 ... one-xl-oil" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;



“Though just six pages long, its dense, technical writing makes it largely incomprehensible to non-experts. And yet this paper is transforming the climate change debate—prompting the financial world to rethink the value of the world's fossil fuel reserves and giving environmental activists a moral argument for action.

That's because behind its complicated terminology is a simple question that affects every aspect of society and business: How much time do we have before the burning of fossil fuels pushes the climate system past tipping points? In a worst-case scenario, about 11 years at current rates of fossil fuel use, according to the paper.

"Once you hear the numbers, at least for me, there is no more room for wishful thinking, for speculation or for doubt," said Bill McKibben, founder of the activist group 350.org. Last year, McKibben plucked the science from popular obscurity and used it in a Rolling Stone article and speaking tour to stoke the moral case for carbon controls.”

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Re: Heat is Online

Postby msfreeh » Sun Feb 17, 2013 5:48 pm

see link for full story
http://www.sun-sentinel.com/news/opinio ... 8490.story" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;


Jerry Karnas: Rubio doing climate change flip-flop


By Jerry Karnas

February 17, 2013

In 2007, who said this?

"Global warming, dependence on foreign sources of fuel, and capitalism have come together to create opportunities for us that were unimaginable just a few short years ago. Today, Florida has the opportunity to pursue bold energy policies not just because they are good for the environment but because people can make money doing it. The demand towards such advances will create an industry to meet it. Florida should be the Silicon Valley of that industry."

And on Feb. 5, 2013, who said this?

"First of all, the climate is always changing. That's not the fundamental question, the fundamental question is whether man-made activity is what's contributing most to it. I understand that people say there is a significant scientific consensus on that issue, but I've actually seen reasonable debate on that principle. The secondary question is, is there anything government can do about that, that will actually make a difference? The United States is a country; it's not a planet."

If you answered "Marco Rubio" to both, you win. If you also noticed the two quotes express opposite viewpoints — well, you'd be right there, too. Why did Rubio flip-flop on climate change? Why is it important?

Sen. Rubio is having a big month. He is on the cover of Time Magazine as the "Republican savior" and gave the Republican response to President Obama's State of the Union. He's emerging as a key figure in the Republican Party.

In 2007, Rubio was speaker of the Florida House of Representatives, and climate change was a hot topic. He helped Gov. Crist pass an historic climate change law — the most progressive energy bill in the history of Florida. The bill lowered emissions, created jobs and reduced our dependence on oil.

In the run-up to the 2010 elections, the climate-denier crowd gained more traction in the Republican Party. Rubio subsequently ran from his climate record so he could win the Republican Senate primary. And he isn't alone among Republicans in disavowing climate change leadership records. Mitt Romney and John McCain did it, too.

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Re: Heat is Online

Postby msfreeh » Sun Feb 17, 2013 7:13 pm

see link for full story
http://tv.globalresearch.ca/2013/02/our ... er-warfare" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;

Our Coming Environmental Catastrophe: Geoengineering and Weather Warfare By James Corbett, February 14, 2013
weather

The practice of geoengineering is now well over half a century old. As early as the late 1940s, American mathematician John von Neumann was researching weather modification and its potential uses in climatic warfare for the US Department of Defense.

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Re: Heat is Online

Postby msfreeh » Mon Feb 18, 2013 1:41 pm

A Glimpse at Our Possible Future Climate, Best to Worst Case Scenarios
Posted on 13 February 2013

http://skepticalscience.com/climate-bes ... arios.html" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;

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Re: Heat is Online

Postby msfreeh » Mon Feb 18, 2013 11:36 pm

http://www.heatisonline.org/contentserv ... ethod=full" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;

Climate paradox: less snow, more blizzards
Climate contradiction: Less snow, more blizzards
By Seth Borenstein, The Associated Press, Feb. 18, 2013

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Re: Heat is Online

Postby msfreeh » Wed Feb 20, 2013 9:33 pm

http://350.org/" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;


Dear Friends,

We were going to send you an inspiring video of last weekend’s Forward on Climate rally, but breaking news just intervened:

Reporters this morning uncovered the fact that while 40,000 or more people were outside the White House asking for his attention about Keystone XL, President Obama was playing golf with oil and pipeline executives in Florida.

His staff didn't allow any pictures at the outing -- likely because it’s an embarrassing spectacle for a President who promised to “end business as usual in Washington” and “respond to the threat of climate change, knowing that failure to do so would betray our children and future generations.”

Listen: this weekend’s action exceeded all expectations -- we made news in more than a dozen countries and on every major television network. We’ve got lots of new momentum that we’re eager to put to work stopping Keystone, pushing for fossil fuel divestment, and a whole host of other next steps.

But President Obama still hasn't answered our question: which side are you on - ours, or the fossil fuel industry's? With such a big, beautiful rally on the Mall, he was certainly on the wrong side this weekend, but if he can get off the links and into the trenches fighting this problem, that can change.

We need to show the White House they can't get away with doing special favors for Big Oil. It’s fine to take a day off every now and then, but it’s just plain wrong to play footsie with the oil industry. Please click here to read and share the whole story, and make a call to the President: act.350.org/call/obama-golf/

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Re: Heat is Online

Postby msfreeh » Thu Feb 21, 2013 10:58 pm

Warming Winters: U.S. Temperature Trends

Published: February 21st, 2013

http://www.climatecentral.org/news/wint ... e-us-15590" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;

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Re: Heat is Online

Postby msfreeh » Sat Feb 23, 2013 4:50 pm

see link for full story
http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2013/02/2 ... _ref=green" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;


Permafrost Melting Rate Could Be Faster And Worse Than We Thought, New Study Finds

“According to a paper published Thursday in Science, that melting could come sooner, and be more widespread, than experts previously believed. If global average temperature were to rise another 2.5°F (1.5°C), say earth scientist Anton Vaks of Oxford University, and an international team of collaborators, permafrost across much of northern Canada and Siberia could start to weaken and decay. And since climate scientists project at least that much warming by the middle of the 21st century, global warming could begin to accelerate as a result, in what’s known as afeedback mechanism.

How much this will affect global temperatures, which are currently projected to rise as much as 9°F by 2100, is impossible to say. It all depends on how quickly the permafrost melts, and how quickly bacteria convert the plant material into carbon dioxide and methane gas, and nobody knows the full answer to that. But since climate scientists already expect a wide range of negative consequences from rising temperatures, including higher sea level, more weather extremes and increasing risks to human health, anything that accelerates warming is a concern.”

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Re: Heat is Online

Postby msfreeh » Tue Feb 26, 2013 1:01 am

http://www.ameg.me/" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;



Arctic Sea Ice - Methane Release - Planetary Emergency
Government response to Environmental Audit Committee report based on non-existing observations, says AMEG
AMEG, the Arctic Methane Emergency Group, hereby formally complains to the UK government that the observations to which they refer in their statement [1] do not exist. The observations taken directly from the ice and recently from satellite, support a very simple model of sea ice behaviour - that the melting, as reflected by the volume average for particular months, is closely following an exponential trend, towards zero for September 2015.

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Re: Heat is Online

Postby msfreeh » Fri Mar 01, 2013 12:42 am

http://www.chasingice.com/" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;

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Re: Heat is Online

Postby msfreeh » Sat Mar 02, 2013 2:33 pm

see link for full story
http://thinkprogress.org/climate/issue/?mobile=nc" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;

For Climate Hawks, The Five Stages Of Grief Are Reversed

By Joe Romm on Mar 1, 2013 at 5:00 pm

The five stages of grief describes “a process by which people allegedly deal with grief and tragedy, especially when diagnosed with a terminal illness or catastrophic loss.” As Wikipedia puts it:

1. Denial
2. Anger
3. Bargaining
4. Depression
5. Acceptance

A few years ago, I heard a very brilliant physicist, Saul Griffiths, use this piece of pop psychology to describe climate science activists (a.k.a. climate hawks), and I realized that he had it backwards. This is an updated post.

THE FIVE STAGES IN REVERSE

Climate hawks begin with accepting the science. What else can one do? Science is the reason so many of us survived childbirth and childhood, science has fed the world, science is the reason computers and the blogosphere exist at all. And yes, science gave us our fossil-fueled wealth. I’m a scientist by training, but I just don’t see how anyone can pick and choose what science you’re going to believe and what not. The scientific method may not be always be perfect in single studies — since it is used by imperfect humans — but it is the best thing we have for objectively determining what has happened, what is happening, and what will happen. It is testable and self-correcting, unlike all other approaches.

Once climate hawks accept the science, many quite naturally get depressed. See “Dealing with climate trauma and global warming burnout.” The situation is beyond dire, and we aren’t doing bloody much about it, in large part because of the successful efforts of the deniers and delayers. Climate science offers a very grim prognosis if we stay anywhere near our current emissions path.

After depression comes a serious effort at bargaining. Climate hawks try to figure out what they can do to stop the catastrophe. Taking actions and making bargains at a personal level and a political level — depending on their level of activism.

Then comes anger. Once you’ve been at this for a while, you get very very frustrated by how little is happening — by the status quo media, the many anti-science politicians, and especially the deniers, the professional disinformers.

Finally, you end up in a kind of denial. It just becomes impossible to believe that the human race is going to be so stupid. Indeed, my rational side finds it hard to believe that we’re going to avoid catastrophic global warming, as any regular CP reader knows. But my heart, in denial, is certain that we will — see “How the world can (and will) stabilize at 350 to 450 ppm: The full global warming solution (updated).”

The great New Yorker write Elizabeth Kolbert perhaps best summed up this form of denial. Her three-part series, “The Climate of Man,” which became the terrific book, Field Notes from a Catastrophe, famously ends:

It may seem impossible to imagine that a technologically advanced society could choose, in essence, to destroy itself, but that is what we are now in the process of doing.

It is impossible to believe. I myself can’t believe it.

msfreeh
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Re: Heat is Online

Postby msfreeh » Sun Mar 03, 2013 11:23 pm

see link for full story
http://www.oregonlive.com/portland/inde ... orism.html" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;

Once the 'Face of Eco-Terrorism,' former Portlander Craig Rosebraugh is now lawyer, filmmaker


March 03, 2013

The man once dubbed "The Face of Eco-Terrorism," who cheered tree-hugging arsonists and thwarted FBI efforts to catch them -- stubbornly taking the Fifth before federal grand juries and an extremely annoyed congressional panel -- is now a red-blooded American lawyer.

Craig Rosebraugh, having spent his late 20s in Portland as the official spokesman for the Earth Liberation Front, earned his sheepskin at the Sandra Day O'Connor College of Law at Arizona State University in May 2011.

But instead of taking the bar exam, he has continued his activism by finishing a movie about global warming, set for release this week.

Rosebraugh doesn't see any irony in his dramatic transformation from government antagonist to -- soon, he hopes -- attorney at law.

"I consider it consistent with just my own development as someone that's trying to make a positive difference in the world," he told The Oregonian in one of several recent interviews. "Every single thing I did has been along the lines of trying to fight against the injustices out there, to make the world a better place for all."

Rosebraugh's first feature-length film, a four-year documentary project provocatively titled "Greedy Lying Bastards," is scheduled to open Friday on more than 50 screens from Honolulu to Toronto, including two in Portland.

Directed, co-written and narrated by Rosebraugh, and backed by executive producer (and environmental activist) Daryl Hannah, the movie offers a scorching critique of what Rosebraugh describes as the scoundrels who shill for the petroleum industry by denying the existence of global warming.

msfreeh
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Re: Heat is Online

Postby msfreeh » Mon Mar 04, 2013 2:54 pm

http://phys.org/news/2013-03-global-aff ... ields.html" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;


Monday, 04 March 2013
Global warming affects crop yields, but it's the water not the heat


Global warming affects crop yields, but it's the water not the heat

"In a paper published this week in Nature, Professor Hammer and his colleagues have demonstrated that the anticipated increase in temperature associated with global warming is not directly linked to an expected decline in yield.

Previously it has been accepted wisdom that the yield losses being experienced by maize growers during hot seasons in the American mid-west were attributable to temperature increases.

The modelling study has shown that it is the associated increase in the evaporative demand for water – causing increased plant water use – that will ultimately cause the decline in crop yield.

It is not a direct effect of heat stress on plant organs from the increase in temperature.

"These two factors are often related, but until now we were simply attributing projected yield declines to increases in temperature and heat stress – and it's more complex than that," Professor Hammer said.

"Our computer models are able to separate the mechanisms and explain what is actually going on. "Increasing temperatures mean increasing demand for water and so greater plant water use and ultimately more water stress during the crop life cycle."

msfreeh
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Re: Heat is Online

Postby msfreeh » Wed Mar 06, 2013 1:52 am

see link for full story

Tuesday, 05 March 2013 16:33
'Like summer on steroids': Australia’s hottest ever year blamed on climate change, with 'really frightening' temperatures in store


http://www.independent.co.uk/news/world ... 19918.html" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;

'Like summer on steroids': Australia’s hottest year blamed on climate change

“A climate “on steroids” was to blame for a summer of record-breaking heatwaves, severe bushfires, cyclones and floods, according to Australia’s leading climate change scientists.

A report by the Climate Commission, an independent body set up by the government, says the extreme weather experienced across the continent was exacerbated by climate change and predicts it will become the norm in years to come. Its author, Will Steffen, warned that some “really frightening” temperatures were in store over the next two decades.

The report, released today, is entitled “Angry Summer” – an apt description of a season during which 123 records were broken. It was Australia’s hottest summer ever, both in terms of nationwide average temperatures and of maximums reached at individual sites. Heatwaves of record intensity and duration fuelled bushfires that raged in every state and territory.”

msfreeh
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Re: Heat is Online

Postby msfreeh » Fri Mar 08, 2013 2:02 pm

TWO STORIES


1st story

see link for full story
http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/20 ... 145303.htm" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;


Reconstruction of Earth Climate History Shows Significance of Recent Temperature Rise

Mar. 7, 2013 — Using data from 73 sites around the world, scientists have been able to reconstruct Earth's temperature history back to the end of the last Ice Age, revealing that the planet today is warmer than it has been during 70 to 80 percent of the time over the last 11,300 years.


Of even more concern are projections of global temperature for the year 2100, when virtually every climate model evaluated by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) shows that temperatures will exceed the warmest temperatures during that 11,300-year period known as the Holocene -- under all plausible greenhouse gas emission scenarios.

Results of the study, by researchers at Oregon State University and Harvard University, were published this week in the journal Science. It was funded by the National Science Foundation's Paleoclimate Program.

Lead author Shaun Marcott, a post-doctoral researcher in Oregon State's College of Earth, Ocean, and Atmospheric Sciences, noted that previous research on past global temperature change has largely focused on the last 2,000 years. Extending the reconstruction of global temperatures back to the end of the last Ice Age puts today's climate into a larger context.

"We already knew that on a global scale, Earth is warmer today than it was over much of the past 2,000 years," Marcott said. "Now we know that it is warmer than most of the past 11,300 years. This is of particular interest because the Holocene spans the entire period of human civilization."

Peter Clark, an OSU paleoclimatologist and co-author on the Science article, said many previous temperature reconstructions were regional in nature and were not placed in a global context. Marcott led the effort to combine data from 73 sites around the world, providing a much broader perspective.

"When you just look at one part of the world, the temperature history can be affected by regional climate processes like El Niño or monsoon variations," noted Clark. "But when you combine the data from sites all around the world, you can average out those regional anomalies and get a clear sense of the Earth's global temperature history."

What that history shows, the researchers say, is that over the past 5,000 years, Earth on average cooled about 1.3 degrees (Fahrenheit) -- until the past 100 years, when it warmed ̴ 1.3 degrees (F). The largest changes were in the northern hemisphere, where there are more land masses and greater human populations.

Climate models project that global temperature will rise another 2.0 to 11.5 degrees (F) by the end of this century, largely dependent on the magnitude of carbon emissions. "What is most troubling," Clark said, "is that this warming will be significantly greater than at any time during the past 11,300 years."

2nd story


see link for full story
http://www.wunderground.com/blog/JeffMa ... rynum=2364" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;


Dr. Jeff Masters' WunderBlog

Sprawling Nor'easter still bringing heavy snow, damaging coastal floods
Posted by: Dr. Jeff Masters, 4:15 PM GMT on March 08, 2013 +18
It's not often that a Nor'easter centered more than 600 miles out to sea brings heavy snow and and major coastal flooding to New England, but Winter Storm Saturn is a one-of-a-kind. The massive storm, which was centered about 600 miles east-southeast of New York City at 7 am EST, sprawls out over a huge area of ocean more than 1000 miles across. While the central pressure of 988 mb is not exceptionally low for a Nor'easter, the sheer size of the storm is allowing Saturn to pile up a formidable storm surge, which hammered the coast of Eastern Massachusetts during the Friday morning high tide cycle, causing severe erosion, widespread street flooding, and damage to roads and houses. Snowfall amounts as high as 18" have fallen in Massachusetts (in West Walpole), and a band of moderate snow has set up along an arc from New York City to Boston. The big storm has dumped 6+" of snow on seventeen states this week, from North Dakota to Massachusetts. The deepest snows fell in the Appalachian Mountains of western Virginia and eastern West Virginia, where a number of locations received over twenty inches. The top snow-getter was Franklin, West Virginia, with 24".


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